Master Gardeners Making a Difference!

Congratulations to UConn Extension Master Gardener Program Holly Kocet and Barbara Thomas out of Extension’s Bethel office for making a difference in their communities! Both women worked to address native plantings for commercial projects.

Solid Ground Agro-Ecology series

posterThe Solid Ground Agro-Ecology series is right around the bend! We’d love for you to join us as we explore On-Farming Composting, No-Till Farming, and Ecological Growing with expert farmers in our state. The first workshop, On-Farm Composting kicks off Tuesday, January 25th from 6:30-8PM over Zoom with Yoko and Alex of Assawaga Farm in Putnam!
 
Sign up to reserve your spot at this event, or others to come by clicking here https://newfarms.uconn.edu/solidground/

Dr. Jeantyl Norze Joins Extension as Evaluation Specialist

Jeantyl NorzeDr. Jeantyl Norze joined Extension as our Evaluation Specialist in January of 2022. “I am very excited to join the UConn CAHNR Extension and hopeful about my contributions to help advance the land grant mission of the university. CAHNR Extension has an amazing dynamic team who is knowledgeable and open to new ideas that help further improve the lives of the residents and communities in the state through better programming,” Dr. Norze says. He is looking forward to meeting everyone to learn more about their work and determine how he can best assist them.

Jeantyl Norze, is a Program Development and Evaluation Specialist who have authored and co-authored numerous publications in a variety of refereed national and international journals. Dr. Norze earned his DVM degree at the Universidad Agraria de La Habana (UNAH) and his master’s degree and Ph.D. degree at Louisiana Sate University where he worked as a graduate research student, post-doctoral fellow, and adjunct faculty. During his tenure at Louisiana State University, he was involved in several research and evaluation projects and taught several courses including leadership development, program development, and program evaluation to undergraduate students, graduate students, and extension educators.

Later, in 2019, Dr. Norze joined the University of Neva Reno Extension as the Program Evaluation Coordinator. In this role, he assisted Extension faculty and staff from a variety of departments including Horticulture, Health and Nutrition, Children, Youth, and Family, Natural Resources, and Economic Development with program evaluation, reporting, and needs assessments. He helped with strengthening the evaluation methods and designs, selecting and developing appropriate evaluation tools to gather credible evidence that demonstrates the contributions of each program. In addition, he participated in multiple evaluation and research projects including food insecurity among college students, educational and mental health needs among Nevadan youth, Tufts longitudinal 4-H study, HANRE needs assessment, and so forth.

He developed, in collaboration with his former colleagues, a needs assessment framework to guide statewide needs assessment efforts that seek to meet and understand the changing needs of the communities. He was also the principal investigator for a national research project sponsored by the Western Center for Metropolitan Extension and Research and the University of Nevada, Reno Extension that sought to examine career progression for urban extension professionals in the country.

Urban Agriculture Webinar – January 19th

hydroponic lettuce in a greenhouseJoin us on January 19th at 7 PM for a webinar on Urban Agriculture Opportunities in Connecticut. Dean Indrajeet Chaubey from the UConn College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources, and Extension educators Jacqueline Kowalski and Jiff Martin are presenting along with the Connecticut Department of Agriculture, USDA, and the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.

Full details and registration are available at https://s.uconn.edu/urbanagwebinar

USDA Crop Insurance Webinar Series

webinar handout

This winter sign up for a webinar series about USDA RMA and USDA FSA crop insurance programs.

  • Livestock and Dairy Insurance Programs webinar – 1/26/22 10-11am
  • FSA NAP Program Update webinar – 1/27/22 11-12pm
  • Multi-Peril Crop Insurance & the NEW Direct Market Tomato Insurance Program webinar – 2/1/22 12-1pm
  • New WFRP Micro Provisions Crop Insurance webinar – 2/3/22 12-1pm

Register at s.uconn.edu/cropinsurancewebinars

Job Openings with Extension and CAHNR

banner of Extension programs

We are hiring! Extension and the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources currently have several open positions. The list of positions is below, as well as the link to the job description and details on how to apply.

Snow Removal Tips

Photo and Article: West Virginia Extension

1360166144Stay safe from slips and strains by following these recommendations for safe and effective snow removal.

  • Shovel all sidewalks adjacent to your property to the bare pavement. This includes any sidewalks outside your fence lines and to the sides/rear of your property.
  • Clear a path at least 36 inches wide. This allows space wide enough for someone using wheelchair, walker or stroller.
  • Strategically pile snow. Don’t create new problems in the street or sidewalk when clearing your car or driveway.
  • Clear ramps at corners and crosswalks. These strategic spots are particularly dangerous and often overlooked.
  • Chop or melt all ice. Ice is the primary cause of falls; it’s not enough to simply remove the snow.
  • Keep street storm drains clear of snow and report clogged drains. The snow will melt, and effective drainage protects streets from icing over and developing potholes.
  • Clear snow around any fire hydrants near your house. Seconds count when a fire occurs and it’s critical for firefighters to find and access hydrants.
  • Shovel frequently. Don’t wait until the snow piles up. Shovel intermittently – after two (2) inches of snow has fallen – to maintain safe conditions and prevent injury when clearing snow and ice.

Be neighborly. Consider helping those who may have difficulty clearing their own sidewalks.

Important health and safety reminders when clearing snow and ice:

  • Stretch during and after working outside. Gently stretch your back, arms and legs to help prevent injury and muscle strain.
  • Keep dry. Change wet clothes frequently to prevent a loss of body heat. Wet clothing loses all of its insulating value and transmits heat rapidly.
  • Cover your mouth. Protect your lungs from extremely cold air by covering your mouth when outdoors.
  • Wear shoes with good soles. Falling is the most common injury when removing snow and ice.
  • Wear shoes with a good cleat tread and layers of absorbing socks.
  • Separate your hands on the shovel. By creating space between your hands, you can increase your leverage on the shovel.
  • Lift with your legs, not your back. Make sure your knees are bending and straightening to lift the shovel instead of leaning forward and straightening with the back.
  • Push the snow. It is easier and better for your back to push the snow rather than lift it. Never throw snow over your shoulders.
  • Avoid overexertion. Cold weather puts an added strain on the heart. Unfamiliar exercise, such as shoveling snow or pushing a car, can bring on a heart attack or make other medical conditions worse.
  • Stay safe. Walk carefully on snowy and icy sidewalks. If using a snowblower, NEVER use your hands to unclog the machine.
  • Maintain an awareness of utilities when removing snow. Do not cover fire hydrants with snow when clearing sidewalks and driveways. Do not shovel snow into the street storm drains.

 

Offer to help individuals who may require special assistance. Seniors and people with disabilities can benefit from a thoughtful neighbor, and they often need extra help during snowy conditions.

Online 4-H Record Book using ZSuite

Have you started your 4-H record book for 2021-2022? This year you can record keep on your mobile device or computer through ZSuite, use printed sheets, and handwrite or download and type into the sheets.
Please check with your club leader or local 4-H Office for more information on how record sheets will be reviewed for project entry at fair.

Learn how to use ZSuite for record keeping by watching this video s.uconn.edu/4-hrecord