Climate

Advancing Adaptation and Resilience in a Changing Climate

New Normal with Extension Programs

banner of Extension programs

Extension educators rose to the challenge and virtually shared our programs and educational outreach over the past year and a half. While we will continue incorporating virtual educational opportunities, we are eager to resume in-person programs as well. A few of our educators share what the new normal with Extension will be for their programs. All our programs will continue serving your needs, including those that are not listed. We continue adhering to all state guidelines, and protocols may adapt as needed.

4-H

The UConn 4-H Program is looking forward to in-person 4-H club and county activities this fall. UConn 4-H delegates plan to participate in various 4-H activities at the Eastern States Exposition and the National 4-H Congress.

Master Gardeners

Master Gardeners have started reconnecting directly with the public through our outdoor activities and look forward to increasing in-person classes and events this fall. Our online experiences over the last year helped us reach an even larger audience, however, and we will continue to incorporate new technologies alongside our familiar hands-on programming. The heightened interest in gardening and environmental projects is likely to continue and we will be here in person, by phone, and online to assist!

CLEAR

Programs at the Center for Land Use Education and Research (CLEAR) are slowly returning in-person outreach into the mix. However, virtually all programs will be retaining elements of the techniques and educational options developed during the pandemic year. The Land Use Academy now has recorded online versions of all basic training modules, available to the user at any time. CLEAR, in concert with the CT Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, is developing a new “one-stop shopping” online training portal (coming soon!) that will include all our virtual programs.

People Empowering People (PEP)

UConn Extension’s People Empowering People (PEP) Program is a parent, community, and civic leadership program, and we are preparing for different possibilities this fall. We plan to offer in-person PEP Communities Training for our local partnering organizations in October. However, we will offer this training online again if needed. Partner organizations can choose to offer the training in-person or online. Our People Empowering People CI Program reaches people who are currently incarcerated in correctional institutions in our state. When the Connecticut Department of Corrections is ready for our trained volunteer facilitators to return and lead the PEP CI program with the partnering institutions, the facilitators will return.

Visit our programs page to find out more about the new normal for our other Extension programs.

CT Trail Finder – #AskUConnExtension

For our first installment of our #AskUConnExtension Showcase, we’re covering CT Trail Finder, a great new tool to help connect you to your next adventure. Perfect for walking, hiking, mountain biking, and exploring nature in our state, CT Trail Finder has got you covered with over 2,000 miles of trails to explore. Visit cttrailfinder.com for more!
boxes over trail image with text
Text: Connecticut Trail Finder, launched on June 5th, 2021, is a free, interactive website connecting trail-goers to over 2,000 miles of state trails. Kimberly Bradley, the CT Trail Finder Program Coordinator, says that the new platform will be the “go-to resource” for anyone looking to get off the beaten path in exploring nature in Connecticut.
green square with text and map background
Text: CT Trail Finder invites you to explore walking, hiking, horseback riding, and a host of other types of trails using their interactive mapping software that directs you where to go!

1st marine economics fellow to focus on natural coastal resources

Ethan Addicott
Ethan Addicott

By Judy Benson

Oversimplified, shoreline beaches are where the sand meets the sea.
Too often, this two-dimensional view has become the foundation of efforts to restore storm and erosion-battered beaches on Long Island Sound and other coastal areas. These projects mainly seek to widen the flat open sand swathe to maintain maximum recreational worth and protect nearby areas from storm and flood damage. Dune grass, beach pea, and the dunes these and other plants inhabit along the shore have largely been left out of the equation.

But thanks to a new marine and coastal economics fellowship created by Connecticut Sea Grant, a Yale University doctoral candidate will spend the next year and a half developing restoration tools that account for the real-world complexity and value of natural and manmade features beyond the sand. The fellowship is funded with $20,000 of the federal funds allocated to CT Sea Grant.

“I’ve been interested in coastal ecosystems since I was young, growing up in Miami,” said Ethan Addicott, 29, who is pursuing his doctorate in environmental and resource economics at Yale and was chosen for the fellowship post. “I’m working to quantify the relationship between healthy dune ecosystems and property values, to enhance the relationship between natural resources and management decision making.”

CT Sea Grant Director Sylvain De Guise said Addicott’s project will accomplish the two main goals of the new fellowship. It was created to help train a new generation of students in marine and coastal economics, and to give coastal communities new resources to draw on in making decisions about threatened coastal areas.

Read More

Bug Out with UConn Extension

monarch butterfly on an orange flower

UConn Extension is celebrating Bug Month from July 1 – 31 with virtual programs and resources for the entire family.

 

All ages are welcome to explore the activities dedicated to insects and their relatives. Bug Month virtual programs and resources are buzzing with the following:

  • Answer a few questions to qualify for a free bug kit. The bug kit comes with a Bug Month activity booklet, supplies for collecting and looking closely at bugs as well as ideas for backyard adventures with the kit. Learn more at https://bugs.uconn.edu/bug-kits/
  • Check out the “Up Close” with the Luna Moth videos to learn more about Luna Moth development. 
  • A beneficial insect section. Read more about beneficial insects in our area and the roles they play. 
  • Want to make some bug-related crafts and recipes? Check out https://bugs.uconn.edu/bug-kits/ for a wide variety of crafts and treats. 
  • Planning to create a pollinator garden? We have added a “Native Plants for Pollinators” section to help you choose plants for your garden. 
  • The Connecticut Science Center will be buzzing with programs to celebrate Bug Month from Monday, July 21 through Sunday, July 27. Spend time in the tropical Butterfly Encounter, participate in bug-themed Live Science programming, hear a bug themed story during Story Time, and be sure to explore what is flying around the Rooftop Garden. 
  • We’re having our photo contest this year with three categories: junior, senior, and professional. Learn more at: http://bugs.uconn.edu/photo-contest/.

Bug Month is one example of UConn Extension’s mission in bringing UConn’s research out to the citizens of the state by addressing insects and their relatives. For more information on Bug Month, please visit our website at https://bugs.uconn.edu/, email bugweek@uconn.edu or call 860-486-9228.

UConn Extension has more than 100 years’ experience strengthening communities in Connecticut and beyond. Extension programs address the full range of issues set forth in the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources strategic initiatives:

  • Ensuring a vibrant and sustainable agricultural industry and food supply
  • Enhancing health and well-being locally, nationally, and globally
  • Designing sustainable landscapes across urban-rural interfaces
  • Advancing adaptation and resilience in a changing climate.

 

Programs delivered by Extension reach individuals, communities, and businesses in each of Connecticut’s 169 municipalities. 

Heat Kills! Problems and Solutions from our EDEN Team

man that is overheated wiping his head with a towel

We are in a period of extreme heat and heat kills! Our Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN) team shares problems and solutions for dealing with extreme heat.

The Problem: Know the Signs

Profuse sweating

Dizziness

Confusion

The Solution: Take Action

Seek shade (outside) or air conditioning (inside)

Drink fluids (water is ideal)

Rest


Learn more at https://eden.uconn.edu/shelter-from-storm/.

This work is supported by Smith-Lever Special Needs Competitive Grants Program 2019- 41210-30065/1020290 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

What should I do if I hear chainsaws in the forest? – #AskUConnExtension

Tom Worthley, one of our Extension foresters, explains what you should do if you hear chainsaws in the UConn Forest or in a forest near your home.

Have more questions? 

Connect with one of our specialists today.

Extension specialists are here to help you, your family, and your community. We have answers to your questions ranging from livestock to farm business and regulations; climate resilience to finding community training opportunities; gardening to wildlife management; fitness to nutrition; and more.

‘Born Out of Crises’ Issue Looks at Responses to Pandemic, Disasters

Spring-Summer 2021 Wrack Lines issueThe Spring-Summer 2021 issue of Wrack Lines examines actions that grew from different crises, from the pandemic to sea level rise to the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster.

The issue leads off with an article by Robert Klee, former commissioner of the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, reflecting on the valuable lessons we can take from the pandemic to improve the environment and our communities. Other articles describe how Connecticut’s seafood growers, harvesters and sellers weathered the pandemic, and how their counterparts in Southeast Asia fared.

Two more articles examine the slower-moving crises of sea level rise in coastal and inland communities in Connecticut and North Carolina and the role of managed retreat or buyouts.  The final piece showcases the research of Connecticut Sea Grant Director Sylvain De Guise on dolphins experiencing long-term impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010.

The entire issue can be found here.

Articles in this issue:

Editor’s column

“Rebuilding a hopeful future after a year of loss”

“Tested by the pandemic, seafood businesses now poised to emerge stronger”

“Small-scale fisheries in Southeast Asia see harsh impacts of COVID-19”

“A tale of two coastal states as the world gets wetter”

“CTSG’s De Guise helped lead research into long-term effects of Deepwater Horizon oil spill on dolphins”

This issue continues the “Talk to Us” feature soliciting reader comments, many of which will be shared on the CTSG website. Share your feedback and questions with Wrack Lines Editor Judy Benson at: judy.benson@uconn.edu. We’d love to hear from you!

 

 

 

CTSG Post 

Job Openings: Educational Program Assistants

banner of Extension programs
Search #: 495338

Educational Program Assistant 1, Tolland County Extension

Search #: 495338
Work type: Full-time
Location: Tolland County Extension Ctr
Categories: Academic Programs and Services

JOB SUMMARY

The UConn Extension Center located in Vernon, CT is seeking applications for two (2) Educational Program Assistant 1 positions – one full-time position and one part-time position (75%).  These positions are responsible for supporting and helping implement high-quality, comprehensive, Extension programming at different program sites throughout the region, with specific support to Farm Business Planning, Beginning Farmer, Food Systems, Food Safety, Vegetable, Master Gardener, and 4-H programs.  The Educational Program Assistants will report to the Center Coordinator to prioritize programmatic work assignments.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

  • Assists and provides programmatic support to Extension Educators
  • Assists in developing educational programs
  • Coordinates recruitment and orientation for Extension volunteers and participants
  • Assists with development and maintenance of program databases using programs such as Excel and Access
  • Maintains accurate records on each program, assembles databases, and prepares statistical and/or historical reports
  • Performs administrative functions in support of educational programs
  • Supports Extension Educators/Program Coordinators in implementing and providing off-site educational activities in the community
  • Provides assistance in assembling, arranging, organizing, and dismantling program event and activity set-ups and arrangements at various locations and venues, i.e. classrooms, fairgrounds, community centers, etc.
  • Supports media relations activities for various programs; assists with promotional material for Extension programs
  • Assists Extension Educators/Program Coordinators in developing and implementing programs to enhance learning and provide appropriate content based experiences to accomplish program goals
  • Under supervision, provides educational training and conducts related support services on an ongoing basis, and assists in resolving problems in assigned area of responsibility
  • Assists with increasing community collaborations with partner groups
  • Performs other related duties as required

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS   

  • Bachelor’s degree in a related field and up to one year of related experience or an Associates degree and two to three years of related experience; or five or more years of profession-based experience in agriculture, food systems, education, 4-H, or related fields.
  • Demonstrated written and verbal communication skills and the ability to work effectively with communication technologies and the media.
  • Proficiency in Microsoft Office Suite including Excel and Access
  • Demonstrated sensitivity towards diverse youth, families, and volunteer clientele to be served.
  • Demonstrated experience providing organizational support in a team environment.
  • Knowledge and familiarity with the Cooperative Extension System.
  • Must be able to regularly lift, carry, load, unload, and transport equipment, supplies, and/or program materials for educational events and workshops such as laptops, projectors, tables, chairs, displays, paper media, etc.
  • Must be willing and able to work flexible and irregular hours, including occasional nights and weekends to help conduct programs at off-site locations.
  • Must have reliable transportation to meet in-state travel requirements (mileage allowance provided).

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS 

  • Demonstrated success in public relations utilizing electronic, social, and print media and platforms such as Cushy and Aurora.
  • Experience working with large databases, and generating reports including 4-H Online.
  • Experience participating with collaborative community partnerships.
  • Experience working with UConn administrative processes.
  • Experience with STEM (Science, Technology. Engineering, and Mathematics) technology.
  • Bilingual Spanish and English

Physical Requirements

Incumbents must possess the ability to perform the required duties set forth above.

APPOINTMENT TERMS

Both positions are located at the Tolland County Extension Center in Vernon, CT, however, regular travel within the region will be required. Occasional in-state travel to other UConn campuses, including Storrs, may be required in support of program needs. These positions include an outstanding full benefits package. Salary will be commensurate with the successful candidate’s background and work experience.

TO APPLY

Please apply online at https://hr.uconn.edu/jobs, Staff Positions, Search #495338 to upload a resume, cover letter, and contact information for three (3) professional references. ** Please indicate in your cover letter if you wish to be considered for the full-time or part-time (75%) position, or both.**

Employment of the successful candidates is contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment criminal background check.

This job posting is scheduled to be removed at 11:55 p.m. Eastern time on June 22, 2021.

All employees are subject to adherence to the State Code of Ethics which may be found at http://www.ct.gov/ethics/site/default.asp.

The University of Connecticut is committed to building and supporting a multicultural and diverse community of students, faculty and staff. The diversity of students, faculty and staff continues to increase, as does the number of honors students, valedictorians and salutatorians who consistently make UConn their top choice. More than 100 research centers and institutes serve the University’s teaching, research, diversity, and outreach missions, leading to UConn’s ranking as one of the nation’s top research universities. UConn’s faculty and staff are the critical link to fostering and expanding our vibrant, multicultural and diverse University community. As an Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity employer, UConn encourages applications from women, veterans, people with disabilities and members of traditionally underrepresented populations.

Advertised: Jun 08 2021 Eastern Daylight Time
Applications close: Jun 22 2021 Eastern Daylight Time

Connecticut Master Woodland Manager Program

Tom Worthely and other instructors in the woods

Make your mark on Connecticut’s woodlands, 

become a Master Woodland Manager!

CFPA is excited to introduce the Connecticut Master Woodland Manager (MWM) program beginning August 2021. This year-long program provides woodland owners and managers with the knowledge and skills that they need to make the right decisions for their woodland that can help enhance their lives and help wildlife and the environment.

The Master Woodland Manager program is right for you if you:

  • Own or interact with a woodland of any size
  • Value Connecticut’s woodlands and want to help steward them for future generations
  • Want to support wildlife and reduce the effects of climate change
  • Want to help your local economy and preserve the legacy of Connecticut’s woodlands

The MWM program provides a flexible, interactive experience that provides both virtual and field learning opportunities. Learn from Connecticut’s top forestry and wildlife professionals, and join a community of woodland supporters!

The Connecticut Master Woodland Manager program is brought to you by a grant from the United States Forest Service and the Connecticut Forest & Park Association through a partnership with the Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection, UConn, Yale, Audubon Connecticut, and Connecticut Land Conservation Council.

Applications accepted until August 2021. For more information and to apply, visit the MWM registration page or email Beth at bbernard@ctwoodlands.org.