Climate

Advancing Adaptation and Resilience in a Changing Climate

Black History Month 2022 – Health and Wellness

Black History Month image
Have your ever wondered about the history of Black History Month? Dr. Carter G. Woodson is credited with bringing to the forefront the importance of teaching about Black History, Culture and Life. Carter G. Woodson, was the son of former slaves, and as a child, worked as a sharecropper, a miner and other odd jobs to help support his large family. Although he entered high school late, he graduated in two years; he attended Berea College in Kentucky, then worked in the Philippines for the U.S. government as a superintendent. He attended the University of Chicago and earned his bachelor’s and master’s degree. Subsequently, he made history as the second African American to earn his doctorate degree from Harvard.
To promote the scientific study of black life and history, Dr. Woodson along with Alexander L. Jackson, George Cleveland Hall, William B. Hartgrove and James E. Stamps, founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH) in 1915, which later became the Association for the Study of African American History (ASAAH). Desiring to educate young African Americans about ancestral history, heritage and achievements, Dr. Carter along with his college fraternity, Omega Psi Phi, started ‘Negro History and Literature Week’ in 1924. Two years later, Dr. Woodson expanded the recognition as Negro History Week in February of 1926.
Dr. Woodson chose February, the birth month of President Abraham Lincoln and Dr. Frederick Douglas, both recognized in as significant figures in African American History. During the 1940’s and before his death in 1950, Dr. Woodson conveyed that black history was too important to be pigeon holed into a limited time frame and was an early proponent of Negro History Year. Dr. Woodson often spoke in West Virginia and blacks there became early adopters of the February celebration as Black History Month. Frederick H. Hammaurabi, a Chicagoan cultural activist, began promoting Black History Month in the mid-1960s. With increasing awareness of African consciousness by black on college campuses, there was an appeal to the ASAAH to change with the times; the Association used its influence for a transformative shift to institutionalize the celebration from Negro History Week to Black History Month in 1976, on the 50th Anniversary of the first Negro History Week. The 2022 Theme for Black History Month is Black Health and Wellness.
Please visit our UConn Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) for health and wellness resources.
02/22 By U.R. Taylor, MS, RDN, CDN
UConn Educator/EFNEP Supervisor
Graphic credit: Jiawei Zhou, UConn NUSC Student

2021 Highlights of Extension Report

 

2021 Highlights of Extension cover

The past two years have challenged us more than anyone could have predicted. Extension adapted our services and programs to continue serving our audiences. We are addressing critical issues related to agriculture and food, climate adaptation, enhancing health and well-being, social justice, and sustainable landscapes. 

Extension is unique because the services we provide are place-based. This place-based perspective allows us to customize solutions for Connecticut residents and we offer programs in all 169 cities and towns. The broader impacts provide our communities with science-based, results driven solutions. Our educators understand the unique challenges that Connecticut faces and co-create solutions for critical issues with those communities.  

Our Highlights of Extension emphasizes the regional work we do in the state. This includes the Coastline, Capital Region, Litchfield Hills, and the Quiet Corner. We share the results of our collaborative partnerships with other state agencies and organizations. Extension’s geographic connection to Connecticut impacts everyone in the state, and we also share the stories of a few of our people and programs that are improving lives.  

Extension continues providing transformational learning experiences to all our audiences. We adapt and collaborate to find solutions for human, environmental, and agricultural issues. 

Thank you for collaborating with us, we are here to serve you. 

Read the full report: s.uconn.edu/highlights21

USDA Announces $1 Billion Investment in Partnerships for Climate-Smart Commodities

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced today at Lincoln University that the U.S. Department of Agriculture is delivering on its promise to expand markets by investing $1 billion in partnerships to support America’s climate-smart farmers, ranchers and forest landowners. The new Partnerships for Climate-Smart Commodities opportunity will finance pilot projects that create market opportunities for U.S. agricultural and forestry products that use climate-smart practices and include innovative, cost-effective ways to measure and verify greenhouse gas benefits. USDA is now accepting project applications for fiscal year 2022. See how to apply

Contaminants of Emerging Concern Project

survey results in a bar graph

Manmade chemicals known as PFAS and microplastics emerged as the top concerns of the 646 people who responded to a survey conducted in late 2021 by the Contaminants of Emerging Concern Project.

The project is being led by the Connecticut, New Hampshire and North Carolina Sea Grant programs along with Lighthouse Consulting Group.

Learn more about the results of this survey at: https://seagrant.uconn.edu/2022/01/17/survey-respondents-share-top-concerns-about-chemical-contaminants/ 

Celebrating Black History Month, The Paradigm Shift

Have your ever wondered about the history of Black History Month? Dr. Carter G. Woodson is credited with bringing to the forefront the importance of teaching about Black History, Culture and Life.

Carter Woodson
Photo courtesy of National Park Service

Carter G. Woodson, was the son of former slaves, and as a child, worked as a sharecropper, a miner and other odd jobs to help support his large family. Although he entered high school late, he graduated in two years; he attended Berea College in Kentucky, then worked in the Philippines for the U.S. government as a superintendent. He attended the University of Chicago and earned his bachelor’s and master’s degree.  Subsequently, he made history as the second African American to earn his doctorate degree from Harvard.

To promote the scientific study of Black life and history, Dr. Woodson along with Alexander L. Jackson, George Cleveland Hall, William B. Hartgrove and James E. Stamps, founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH) in 1915, which later became the Association for the Study of African American History (ASAAH). Desiring to educate young African Americans about ancestral history, heritage and achievements, Dr. Carter along with his college fraternity, Omega Psi Phi, started ‘Negro History and Literature Week’ in 1924. Two years later, Dr. Woodson expanded the recognition as Negro History Week in February of 1926. Dr. Woodson chose February, the birth month of President Abraham Lincoln and Dr. Frederick Douglas, both recognized in as significant figures in African American History.

During the 1940’s and before his death in 1950, Dr. Woodson conveyed that Black history was too important to be pigeon holed into a limited time frame and was an early proponent of Negro History Year. Dr. Woodson often spoke in West Virginia and Blacks there became early adopters of the February celebration as Black History Month. Frederick H. Hammaurabi, a Chicagoan cultural activist, began promoting Black History Month in the mid-1960s. With increasing awareness of African consciousness by Black on college campuses, there was an appeal to the ASAAH to change with the times; the Association used its influence for a transformative shift to institutionalize the celebration from Negro History Week to Black History Month in 1976, on the 50th Anniversary of the first Negro History Week.

The 2022 Theme for Black History Month is Black Health and Wellness. UConn Extension’s Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) is celebrating with fun food facts, recipe and much more. Stay tuned throughout this month!

Article By U.R. Taylor, MS, RDN, CDN (02/2022)

UConn Extension Educator/EFNEP Supervisor

NOAA designates nation’s 30th NERR in southeastern CT

map of ct coastNational Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)’s announced that a network of state-owned properties in Lyme, Old Lyme and Groton, CT and portions of the surrounding waters has been designated as the nation’s 30th National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR). The Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) worked in close partnership with NOAA, the University of Connecticut (UConn), Connecticut Sea Grant (CTSG), the Connecticut Audubon Society (CAS), and numerous other organizations and individuals to lead the designation process.   The resulting Connecticut NERR (CT NERR) includes the land areas of Lord Cove Natural Area Preserve, Roger Tory Peterson Natural Area Preserve (formerly Great Island Wildlife Management Area), Pine Island, Haley Farm State Park, and Bluff Point State Park, Coastal Reserve and Natural Area Preserve, as well as portions of the surrounding open-water areas of Long Island Sound and the Thames and Connecticut Rivers. It also includes the DEEP Marine District Headquarters in Old Lyme and the UConn Avery Point campus in Groton.  These locations provide critical habitat for birds, fish, and other marine and coastal species of plants and animals in the region and the designation of these areas as a NERR will help provide valuable opportunities for these “living laboratories” to advance relevant efforts in environmental science, monitoring, education, and stewardship.

Solid Ground Agro-Ecology series

posterThe Solid Ground Agro-Ecology series is right around the bend! We’d love for you to join us as we explore On-Farming Composting, No-Till Farming, and Ecological Growing with expert farmers in our state. The first workshop, On-Farm Composting kicks off Tuesday, January 25th from 6:30-8PM over Zoom with Yoko and Alex of Assawaga Farm in Putnam!
 
Sign up to reserve your spot at this event, or others to come by clicking here https://newfarms.uconn.edu/solidground/

Dr. Jeantyl Norze Joins Extension as Evaluation Specialist

Jeantyl NorzeDr. Jeantyl Norze joined Extension as our Evaluation Specialist in January of 2022. “I am very excited to join the UConn CAHNR Extension and hopeful about my contributions to help advance the land grant mission of the university. CAHNR Extension has an amazing dynamic team who is knowledgeable and open to new ideas that help further improve the lives of the residents and communities in the state through better programming,” Dr. Norze says. He is looking forward to meeting everyone to learn more about their work and determine how he can best assist them.

Jeantyl Norze, is a Program Development and Evaluation Specialist who have authored and co-authored numerous publications in a variety of refereed national and international journals. Dr. Norze earned his DVM degree at the Universidad Agraria de La Habana (UNAH) and his master’s degree and Ph.D. degree at Louisiana Sate University where he worked as a graduate research student, post-doctoral fellow, and adjunct faculty. During his tenure at Louisiana State University, he was involved in several research and evaluation projects and taught several courses including leadership development, program development, and program evaluation to undergraduate students, graduate students, and extension educators.

Later, in 2019, Dr. Norze joined the University of Neva Reno Extension as the Program Evaluation Coordinator. In this role, he assisted Extension faculty and staff from a variety of departments including Horticulture, Health and Nutrition, Children, Youth, and Family, Natural Resources, and Economic Development with program evaluation, reporting, and needs assessments. He helped with strengthening the evaluation methods and designs, selecting and developing appropriate evaluation tools to gather credible evidence that demonstrates the contributions of each program. In addition, he participated in multiple evaluation and research projects including food insecurity among college students, educational and mental health needs among Nevadan youth, Tufts longitudinal 4-H study, HANRE needs assessment, and so forth.

He developed, in collaboration with his former colleagues, a needs assessment framework to guide statewide needs assessment efforts that seek to meet and understand the changing needs of the communities. He was also the principal investigator for a national research project sponsored by the Western Center for Metropolitan Extension and Research and the University of Nevada, Reno Extension that sought to examine career progression for urban extension professionals in the country.

Job Openings with Extension and CAHNR

banner of Extension programs

We are hiring! Extension and the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources currently have several open positions. The list of positions is below, as well as the link to the job description and details on how to apply.