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Support for Extension

photos of people at Extension programs
Thank you! Your support helped us co-create solutions to the critical issues facing Connecticut in 2021. We are committed to providing transformational learning experiences to all our audiences. Extension continues to adapt and collaborate to find solutions for the human, environmental, and agricultural issues that our state faces. You can support Extension at: s.uconn.edu/givetoextension

Celebrate Native American History with Recipes

November is Native American History month and our UConn Extension Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) recommends adding some Native American recipes to your menu. We have the Blueberry Slump and Three Sisters recipes in English and Spanish.

blueberry slump

In Native American folklore, blueberries are called “star berries’ because the blossom at the end of the blueberry make a perfect five pointed star. Blueberries along with leaves and roots were also used for healing purposes. They were dried in the sun and used for soups, stews and also rubbed onto meats to preserve them. Native Americans created a blueberry baked dessert called Saututhig (say ‘sawi-taw-teeg’), a simple pudding made with blueberries, cracked corn and water. Try this Blueberry Slump (cobbler) recipe, which may be related to the traditional Native American Saututhig. Download the recipe in English and Spanish.

Three Sisters meal

Do you know who “The Three Sisters” are? In Native American culture, corn, beans and squash are three inseparable sisters who grow and thrive together. The Three Sisters Garden is a Native American tradition of planting these crops to create the perfect biodiverse crop- preventing weeds and pests while enriching the soil and supporting each other. This recipe combines “Three Sisters” plus kale, cranberries, brown and wild rice to create a delicious and colorful dish! Download the recipe in English and Spanish.

By Umekia Taylor, MS, RD, CD-N, UConn EFNEP Program

Faces of Extension: Bill Davenport

Bill DavenportBill Davenport quote

Meet Bill Davenport, our UConn 4-H Litchfield County Educator. “After growing up as an active UConn 4-H member, my ultimate career goal was to become a UConn 4-H Educator so I could help provide 4-H youth with the life-changing experiences, skills and friendships I received from my own 4-H experience. I am thrilled to finally reach my goal of being the Litchfield County UConn 4-H Educator!”

Interested in joining 4-H?

kids in 4h4-H provides youth with the opportunity to develop lifelong skills including civic engagement and healthy living. Programs are based in all eight Connecticut counties with clubs, after-school programs, and other opportunities. Learn more and enroll your child in the UConn 4-H program by reaching out to your local Extension Educator at s.uconn.edu/locations

Almost any interest area can be a 4-H project! Some projects include:

  • Animal projects
  • Photography
  • Computers
  • Home arts
  • Entomology
  • Plants and gardening
  • Citizenship

Enrolling Now: People Empowering People Communities

Our communities need leaders, and empowered people create positive action. We are registering community members for our in person and online People Empowering People (PEP) Communities Facilitator Training now. Learn more at https://pep.extension.uconn.edu/.

Job Openings in Farmington and Bethel

woman raising her hand in a classroom surrounded by other people
We’re hiring! Extension has two positions open:
  • Assistant/Associate Cooperative Extension Educator (UConn 4-H educator based in our Bethel office)
  • Educational Program Assistant 1, Hartford County Extension (75% part-time position located in Hartford).
 

Educational Program Assistant (75% Position)

JOB SUMMARY

The UConn Extension Center located in Farmington, CT is seeking applications for one Educational Program Assistant 1, part-time position (75%).  The position is responsible for supporting and helping implement high-quality, comprehensive, Extension programming at different program sites throughout the region, with specific support to Forest Resources, EFNEP, Master Gardener, and 4-H programs.  The Educational Program Assistant will report to the Center Coordinator to prioritize programmatic work assignments.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

Include but are not limited to:

  • Assists and provides support to Extension Educators working with programs that may include but not be limited to Forest Resources, EFNEP, Master Gardener, and 4-H programs.
  • Assists in developing educational programs, recruiting, explaining, and providing program information and processes to Extension volunteers and participants.
  • Works with and helps develop and refine program databases using programs such as Excel and Access, to extrapolate relevant data sets, maintain program enrollments, membership, and volunteer records, and provide program reports to the Extension educators as required.
  • Maintains accurate records on each program and assembles databases and prepares statistical and/or historical reports for Extension educators/Program Coordinators based on program outcomes.
  • Performs office support functions in support of educational programs; processes paperwork, records, and files that may be computerized.
  • Supports Extension Educators/Program Coordinators in implementing and providing off-site educational activities in the community to improve practical understanding and accomplish program goals.
  • Provides assistance in assembling, arranging, organizing, and dismantling program event and activity set-ups and arrangements at various locations and venues, i.e. classrooms, fairgrounds, community centers, etc.
  • Supports media relations activities for various programs; works with others to write and edit program and promotional materials for hard and soft copy publications and social media platforms.
  • Assists Extension Educators/Program Coordinators in assessing clients’ capacity to participate in programs and helping to incorporate related knowledge into program activities for greatest learning opportunities.
  • Assists Extension Educators/Program Coordinators in developing and implementing programs to enhance learning and provide appropriate content-based experiences to accomplish program goals.
  • Under supervision, provides educational training and conducts related support services on an ongoing basis, and assists in resolving problems in assigned area of responsibility.
  • Assists with increasing community collaborations with partner groups.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS   

  • Bachelor’s degree in a related field and up to one year of related experience; or an Associate’s degree and two to three years of related experience; or three to four years of profession-based experience in agriculture, food systems, education, 4-H, or related fields.
  • Demonstrated written and verbal communication skills and the ability to work effectively with communication technologies and the media.
  • Proficiency in Microsoft Office Suite including Excel and Access and other database activities.
  • Demonstrated sensitivity towards diverse youth, families, and volunteer clientele to be served.
  • Demonstrated experience providing organizational support in a team environment.
  • Knowledge and familiarity with the Cooperative Extension System.
  • Must be able to regularly lift, carry, load, unload, and transport equipment, supplies, and/or program materials for educational events and workshops such as laptops, projectors, tables, chairs, displays, paper media, etc.
  • Must be willing and able to work flexible and irregular hours, including occasional nights and weekends to help conduct programs at off-site locations.
  • Must have reliable transportation to meet in-state travel requirements (mileage allowance provided).

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS 

  • Demonstrated success in public relations utilizing electronic, social, and print media and platforms such as Cushy/Aurora.
  • Experience working with large databases, and generating reports including 4-H online registration.
  • Experience participating with collaborative community partnerships.
  • Experience working with UConn administrative processes.
  • Experience with STEM (Science, Technology. Engineering, and Mathematics) technology.
  • Bilingual Spanish and English

Physical Requirements

Incumbents must possess the ability to perform the required duties set forth above.

APPOINTMENT TERMS

The position is located at the Hartford County Extension Center in Farmington, CT, however, regular travel within the region will be required. Occasional in-state travel to other UConn campuses, including Storrs, may be required in support of program needs. This part-time position includes an outstanding full benefits package. Salary will be commensurate with successful candidate’s backgrounds and experiences.

TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT

Employment at the University of Connecticut is contingent upon the successful candidate’s compliance with the University’s Mandatory Workforce COVID-19 Vaccination Policy.  This Policy states that all workforce members are required to have or obtain a Covid-19 vaccination as a term and condition of employment at UConn, unless an exemption or deferral has been approved.

Employment of the successful candidate is contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment criminal background check.

TO APPLY

Please apply online at https://hr.uconn.edu/jobs, Staff Positions, Search #495676 to upload a resume, cover letter, and contact information for three (3) professional references.

This job posting is scheduled to be removed at 11:55 p.m. Eastern time on October 30, 2021.

All employees are subject to adherence to the State Code of Ethics which may be found at http://www.ct.gov/ethics/site/default.asp.

The University of Connecticut is committed to building and supporting a multicultural and diverse community of students, faculty and staff. The diversity of students, faculty and staff continues to increase, as does the number of honors students, valedictorians and salutatorians who consistently make UConn their top choice. More than 100 research centers and institutes serve the University’s teaching, research, diversity, and outreach missions, leading to UConn’s ranking as one of the nation’s top research universities. UConn’s faculty and staff are the critical link to fostering and expanding our vibrant, multicultural and diverse University community. As an Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity employer, UConn encourages applications from women, veterans, people with disabilities and members of traditionally underrepresented populations.

Advertised: Sep 30 2021 Eastern Daylight Time
Applications close: Oct 30 2021 Eastern Daylight Time


Assistant/Associate Extension Educator

INTRODUCTION

The Department of Extension is seeking applicants for a full-time (11-month), non-tenure track Assistant/Associate Extension Educator, primarily based at the Fairfield County Extension Office in Bethel, CT.  Extension Educators are community-based faculty who make a difference in communities by connecting community needs with university resources. Position level/rank will be commensurate with experience working with Extension.  The anticipated start date is January 2022.

The successful candidate shall create an active 4-H youth development program with a focus on STEM, food, and agricultural literacy.  The program of work shall meet critical needs in the heavily urban southwest region of the state and build the community knowledge base through a multidisciplinary, collaborative program especially in diverse, underserved communities. State and multi-state programming are also expected.  Work will be accomplished by utilizing innovative approaches to deliver timely, evidence-based solutions for participants to significantly increase youth and adult volunteers’ understanding of how food, agriculture, and STEM activities improve their communities. This position may work closely with Agri-Science programs to transition K-8 youth into high school agriculture/aquaculture science programs and other related workforce and career development programming such as MANRRS (Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences).  In addition to community-based learning, this position will extend the reach of UConn Extension by integrating distance-learning technology into program delivery through computer applications, web pages, electronic mailings, multimedia, and emerging technologies.  This 4-H Extension educator is a vital member of the UConn 4-H Youth Development Team and reports to the Head, Department of Extension.  For more information about the University of Connecticut 4-H Extension Program, see http://www.4-h.uconn.edu/

The College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources (CAHNR) at the University of Connecticut contributes to a sustainable future through scientific discovery, innovation, and community engagement. CAHNR’s accomplishments result in safe, sustainable, and secure plant and animal production systems, healthier individuals and communities, greater protection and conservation of our environment and natural resources, balanced growth of the economy, and resilient local and global communities. We epitomize the role of a land-grant university to develop knowledge and disseminate it through the three academic functions of teaching, research, and outreach. In so doing, we improve the lives of citizens of our state, region, and country.

Founded in 1881, UConn is a Land Grant and Sea Grant institution and member of the Space Grant Consortium. It is the state’s flagship institution of higher education and includes a main campus in Storrs, CT, four regional campuses throughout the state, and 13 Schools and Colleges, including a Law School in Hartford, and Medical and Dental Schools at the UConn Health campus in Farmington. The University has approximately 10,000 faculty and staff and 32,000 students, including nearly 24,000 undergraduates and over 8,000 graduate and professional students. UConn is a Carnegie Foundation R1 (highest research activity) institution, among the top 25 public universities in the nation. Through research, teaching, service, and outreach, UConn embraces diversity and cultivates leadership, integrity, and engaged citizenship in its students, faculty, staff, and alumni. UConn promotes the health and well-being of citizens by enhancing the social, economic, cultural, and natural environments of the state and beyond. The University serves as a beacon of academic and research excellence as well as a center for innovation and social service to communities. UConn is a leader in many scholarly, research, and innovation areas. Today, the path forward includes exciting opportunities and notable challenges. Record numbers of undergraduate applications and support for student success have enabled the University to become extraordinarily selective.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

Include but are not limited to

  • Develops and implements an active outreach and applied-research program on cutting-edge 4-H STEM, food, and agricultural literacy-related activities that foster state, regional, and national recognition.
  • Works with other faculty and staff and partner organizations in a multidisciplinary team environment to create and deliver age-appropriate program materials. Sets up program sites and meeting rooms for the presentation of programs that involve transporting, lifting, and moving boxes of educational and/or program materials as well as tables, chairs, etc., as needed.
  • Create partnerships with other agencies and organizations and actively seek out grants and funding sources to support innovative community programs and outreach efforts.
  • Advances CAHNR’s commitment to equity and inclusion by 1) considering sources of bias and structural inequity based on race, ethnicity, disability, gender, and sexual orientation, and when appropriate, 2) implementing programs that address the burden these injustices impose on members of the community and residents of the state.
  • Evaluate county and designated state 4-H youth development program accomplishments, outcomes, impacts, and create scholarly materials from findings through Cooperative Extension publications and high-impact professional journals.
  • Develop a diverse portfolio of educational materials for Extension stakeholders, clients, and professional peers.
  • Uses assessment techniques to identify local needs and ensure cultural relevancy and appropriateness of 4-H programs and initiatives.
  • Develop and implement adult and youth volunteer programs including recruitment, training, management, evaluation, and recognition.
  • Increase program visibility via face-to-face and electronic communication – including websites and social media.
  • Design training opportunities and expand contact with adult volunteers and teens to help them assume leadership, management, education, and information delivery roles in support of the 4-H program through a variety of digital platforms and avenues of communication.
  • Advise and guide the work of county-based 4-H youth and volunteer committees, including but not limited to evaluation events such as 4-H fairs, food, STEM, and others.
  • Manages and executes multiple tasks with little supervision, meeting strict deadlines.
  • Works with sensitive information and maintains confidentiality.
  • Participate in regular 4-H team and Department of Extension meetings.
  • Compile data and prepare required reports.
  • Supervise program staff, students, and others as assigned to further program activities, which includes program site locations throughout the southwest region of the state.
  • Perform related duties as assigned and/or required.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS

  • An earned Master’s and Bachelor’s degree in food or agricultural sciences, education, or related field.
  • At least three years of professional experience working with youth development programs including the areas of food and/or agricultural literacy.
  • For the Associate position level, candidates must have at least five years of experience as an Assistant Extension Educator or the academic equivalent and provide evidence of appropriate outreach and applied research.
  • Experience in grantsmanship and publication of Extension reports, peer-reviewed articles, or electronic media that communicate program results.
  • At least three years of experience in managing or working with volunteers.
  • Experience in program coordination and facilitation, including organization, delivery, and evaluation.
  • Demonstrated use of the latest research-based and experiential learning-based information and tools to demonstrate creativity, ability to think systematically, willingness, and ability to incorporate innovative solutions.
  • Demonstrated ability to work cohesively with diverse audiences including youth, adults, volunteers, and other groups.
  • Demonstrated skills in collaboration and developing partnerships with other professionals and organizations to accomplish team goals.
  • Excellent communications skills, including writing, listening, public speaking, and presentation skills.
  • Computer literacy, including working knowledge of Microsoft Office Suite.
  • Must be willing and able to work occasional evening and weekend hours.
  • Must have reliable transportation and a valid driver’s license.
  • Must possess the adequate physical strength, stamina, agility, and fitness to perform the required duties.

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS

  • Earned Ph.D. in the field of food or agricultural sciences, education, or closely related field.
  • Experience with integrated Extension programs and the land-grant university system.
  • Demonstrated applied research interests associated with STEM programming.
  • Demonstrated experience with enhancing diversity and inclusion in educational program development and implementation.
  • Experience in leading a large multi-disciplinary, multi-functional grant-funded project.

PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS

Must possess the adequate physical strength, stamina, agility, and fitness to perform the required duties.

APPOINTMENT TERMS  

This is a full-time 11-month, non-tenure track faculty position with a generous benefits package. For more information on benefits, go to:  https://hr.uconn.edu/employee-benefits-overview/.  Starting salary and position rank for this position will be commensurate with training and experience.

TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT

Employment at the University of Connecticut is contingent upon the successful candidate’s compliance with the University’s Mandatory Workforce COVID-19 Vaccination Policy.  This Policy states that all workforce members are required to have or obtain a Covid-19 vaccination as a term and condition of employment at UConn, unless an exemption or deferral has been approved.

Employment of the successful candidate is contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment criminal background check.

TO APPLY

Please apply online to Academic Jobs Online https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/18891 and submit the following application materials:

  • A cover letter that addresses qualifications identified in the advertisement,
  • Curriculum vitae,
  • Commitment to diversity statement (including broadening participation, integrating multicultural experiences in instruction and research and pedagogical techniques to meet the needs of diverse learning styles, etc.);
  • Writing sample to reflect an initiative you would implement in Extension Programming;
  • Contact information for three (3) letters of reference.

Please demonstrate through your written application materials how you meet the minimum qualifications and any of the preferred/desirable qualifications.

At the University of Connecticut, our commitment to excellence is complemented by our commitment to building a culturally diverse community.

This job will be filled subject to budgetary approval.

All employees are subject to adherence to the State Code of Ethics, which may be found at http://www.ct.gov/ethics/site/default.asp.

The University of Connecticut is committed to building and supporting a multicultural and diverse community of students, faculty and staff. The diversity of students, faculty and staff continues to increase, as does the number of honors students, valedictorians and salutatorians who consistently make UConn their top choice. More than 100 research centers and institutes serve the University’s teaching, research, diversity, and outreach missions, leading to UConn’s ranking as one of the nation’s top research universities. UConn’s faculty and staff are the critical link to fostering and expanding our vibrant, multicultural and diverse University community. As an Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity employer, UConn encourages applications from women, veterans, people with disabilities and members of traditionally underrepresented populations.

Extension EFNEP Programming Positively Impacts Participants

Heather and a volunteer in their masksOur Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) shifted during the pandemic, just as everyone did. Last summer I had the opportunity to work with Bristol and New Britain HRA programs teaching their summer youth employment program. Their Program Director asked me to create a five-week virtual class, with 16 hours’ worth of work per week for their students. We had 20 students on each program. The program started three weeks after I received the request and I had to quickly think about how to best teach EFNEP nutrition education virtually to teenagers!
I was lucky to have a UConn student intern, Autumn Blasi, to help with the program! Although we never met in person, we worked together virtually to create a one of kind program!
I learned and used  Google classroom to create meaningful lessons for students. Each week students had to watch videos,  research, and complete project-based assignments. Students had to photograph their gardens each week to show progress. Students researched how to do different exercises and had to create beginners’ guides. Every week we had a virtual WebEx class.
Each week of the EFNEP/HRA program was theme-based on the growth of a plant. Week one was seeds and roots, week two was stems, week three was leaves, week four was flowers, week five was fruits and vegetables. Each week students had to find foods and recipes based on the week’s theme. They also had to research and report on nutrient and calorie content, selection, and storage of foods from the weeks theme.  I decided to do three “distribution” days every other week, that gave the students the tools to do hands-on, project-based learning at home.  I also divided the program into four concentration areas: gardening, nutrition, fitness, and future self with four hours of work in each. We had the students create SMART goals for each concentration area. Students had to photograph their gardens each week to show progress. Students researched how to do different exercises and had to create beginners’ guides. Every week we had four separate virtual WebEx classes with different groups of students. On distribution weeks we had a hands-on virtual class where we made recipes together.
In the beginning of the process I thought students would want connection to other students and tried to create group projects. I also thought students would want to be “seen” through the process, but they usually did not want to have their camera on. It was always their choice! It seemed that they liked the affirmation of the grading process best. They strived to do the work and wanted to make sure I SAW it. They were polite and engaged and asked for more work! They would ask for the  next weeks work if they finished the present weeks work. They started to become more confident and comfortable with the process over the last weeks. I  learned a lot during the process. I am grateful for the project!
On week one, we scheduled a safe, socially distanced distribution to students. Each student received a “EFNEP cooking kit”- with a meat thermometer, measuring cups, recipe books, and an insulated grocery bag. They also received a “container pizza garden”- students had a chance to identify each plant and plant their containers, it was like 40 – 10 minute lessons from afar! These distribution were done in the community at two different locations.
On week three we distributed the ingredients for overnight oats, and a fear factor food (spinach) to do our online recipe together. We had many technical difficulties that day and our intern stepped in to “show” the recipe because I lost video! We had the students “use your oats again,” and use your fear factor food and post the pictures. The students did an amazing job!
On week five we distributed prizes and the ingredients for our last WebEx virtual recipe, ” Salsa Pasta.” I had hoped to use the vegetables from the student’s container gardens, but the plants the agency provided were very small. I had to replace some students’ plants during the program due to critters eating them! This was my most successful video and audio! I finally figured out how to just use my office for the recipe. I made the recipe four times – two groups on Wednesday and two groups on Thursday. I also gave students other ways to make the recipe into soup and macaroni and cheese.
I heard from parents who said they benefitted from the class, in addition to their child. Especially downloading a step tracker and food diary app. They liked the SMART goals and saw improvement in some of their children’s behavior and confidence.
Our student intern, Autumn added so much to the program! She added assignments for the students on body image, diabetes, how to dress for an interview, and critiquing nutrition information on social media.
Article by Heather Pease, UConn EFNEP Educator

Unpeeled: The Case Files of Maya McCluen Game is Available

Maya McCluen and the text Unpeeled behind herNavigating the grocery store aisle is challenging for many consumers—especially those who want to buy the most nutritious food and stay within their budget. The University of Connecticut (UConn) Extension New Technologies in Agricultural Extension (NTAE) team developed an interactive learning activity (or game), Unpeeled: The Case Studies of Maya McCluen. Our team sought to clarify food marketing labels and empower consumers to make science-based decisions while shopping. The game and other resources from our team are available at s.uconn.edu/unpeeled.

Food manufacturers and distributors cover their boxed, canned, and bottled foods with labels like “whole grain” and “low-calorie” to suggest that their food has certain health benefits. Among the most misunderstood food marketing labels are “non-GMO,” “natural,” and “organic:”

  • In a representative survey conducted by GMO Answers (2018), 69% of consumers could not define GMO (genetically modified organism). Wunderlich et al. (2019) surveyed members of Montclair State University and found that over 98% of respondents had heard of the term “GMO,” but only 8% of consumers were familiar with the definition.
  • “Organic” foods are often credited with health and nutrition benefits that the food does not have (Noone, 2019). This is in part due to media framing that portrays organic as ethical, healthier, and more nutritious (Meyers & Abrams, 2010).
  • The “natural” label, which is not well regulated, has various meanings depending on who is using it (Nosowitz, 2019).

Our project started in 2017 when members of our team formed the Science of GMOs working group at UConn (gmo.uconn.edu). Our team was one of the eight selected for NTAE’s second annual grant program, and we expanded the project to encompass additional food marketing labels and include new members with other areas of expertise. Team members include representation from nutrition, biotechnology, youth development, communications, and food marketing.

Dr. Cindy Tian, a member of our team and biotechnology professor, answered some common questions about GMOs for audiences:

  • Why is there not a human trial on GMOs? It is not required by the regulation of the FDA. However, a myriad of tests and safety requirements must be conducted/met before any GMOs are marketed. Humans have been consuming GMOs since 1996 and not a single credible adverse event has been reported.
  • Do GMOs change our genome? No. Everything biological we eat today has been genetically modified mainly by breeding and a few by genetic engineering. Humans have been eating genetically modified food since the beginning of time. We are still humans.
  • Is our genome pristine? No. Like other species, our DNA changes constantly. DNA molecules are very fragile, they break all the time, get sewed back and many times wrong pieces get put together. If these changes happen in our germ cells, they may get passed down. But this is rare. Through millions of years of evolution, the human genome accumulated 10,000 copies of viral DNA molecules.
  • Speaking of virus, the COVID vaccines (in the US) are GMOs. The viral genome is broken down and only small pieces are used for the vaccines so we will never get COVID from the vaccine itself (unlike some earlier Polio vaccines).

Members of our team are also offering the virtual course Let’s Talk GMOs: Creating Consistent Communication Messages. Participants are introduced to the basics of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). They will learn how to create consistent communication messages and manage dialogue processes about GMOs with various audiences. The asynchronous course is available on-demand; it has eight online modules with instructors from UConn. The fee is $49. Register online at s.uconn.edu/gmocourse.

Game development was made possible through support by the Learning Games Lab at New Mexico State University. An eFieldbook about our project will be available on Connect Extension in early September. The Extension Foundation supports this team through key informant expertise to help grow the overall project. We had additional funding and support from UConn Extension and Northeast AgEnhancement and Farm Credit East.

Recover From Tropical Storm Henri

damaged house on the coast

We understand that there will be a lot of cleanup required when Tropical Storm Henri recedes. Our friends at LSU AgCenter have curated the following resources in response to hurricanes and severe weather in their area. These can help you as you use a generator, recover, and clean up from the storm.

Our UConn Extension EDEN disaster publications list is available at: https://eden.uconn.edu/disaster-publications/ and includes many resources to help you recover.

We also have several publications there that would be helpful before, during, and following a disaster. 

Many of us were fortunate that Tropical Storm Henri did not live up to its potential, but it is likely that we will face more severe storms in the future. Now is a great time to work on being better prepared. We have several publications that can help you and your family take steps now:

Stay safe as we clean up, recover, and prepare for future storms.