Health

Enhancing health and well-being locally, nationally, and globally

Infant Formula Shortage

Infant Formula Shortage – y en Espanol

infant formula shortage infographicHave you or someone you know been impacted by the infant formula supply shortage?  You may be wondering how this happened and what to do about it. In February 2022, Abbott Laboratory, an infant formula company, recalled several of its formulas due to complaints about infants affected after formula consumption. In addition, there was bacteria found in part of their building that did not produce the formula.  Abbott voluntarily recalled those formulas. The formula recall plus the pandemic related food supply shortage has resulted in a nationwide shortage. There are some important steps to keep in mind so that all babies have enough and safe sources of needed formula and or breastmilk. Breastfeeding is always healthier for a baby’s nutrition and immune system, but some moms are not able to breastfeed or may not produce enough breast milk. Get advice from your doctor and nutritionist/dietitian. If you receive W.I.C. (Women, Infants and Children) Program benefits, you can talk with the program nutritionists about getting help with breastfeed techniques if you are breastfeeding or receiving formula sources that your baby needs.

     Do

     Don’t

Do choose a safe infant formula. Don’t make homemade formula.
Do follow formula directions to prepare properly and safely, Don’t give watered down formula.
Do follow your doctor and nutritionist advice for formula. Don’t give your baby cow’s milk, toddler milk or milk substitutes (unless told by your doctor).
Do find safe places to buy or get safe donations. Don’t buy formula from unknown online sites or  from outside the United States.
If you do need breastmilk, find safe breast milk banks, Don’t accept breast milk donations from unknown sources.

Remember to wash your hands before preparing formula and to store formula or breastmilk properly.    Find Infant Formula   CT WIC updates   CT Formula Temporary Substitution List

*The Federal Government has now started emergency production as well as locating formula that meets FDA standards as well as locating formula sources from oversees  that meet FDA safety standards. 

Sources: https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts/abbott-voluntarily-recalls-powder-formulas-manufactured-one-plant  ; https://www.fns.usda.gov/ofs/infant-formula-safety; https://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/InfantandToddlerNutrition/formula-feeding/choosing-an-infant-formula.html

Written and Compiled by

Umekia R. Taylor, MS, RDN, CDN, Heather Peracchio, MS, RDN, CDN, Sherry Gray, MPH, RD, Michael J. Puglisi, Ph.D., R.D. 

Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)

05/2022 


Escasez de Fórmula Infantil

infant formula shortage infographic¿Usted o alguien que conoce se ha visto afectado por la escasez de fórmula infantil? Quizás se pregunte cómo sucedió esto y qué hacer al respecto. En febrero de 2022, Abbott Laboratory, una empresa de fórmulas para bebés retiró del mercado varias de sus fórmulas debido a quejas sobre bebés afectados después de su consumo. Además, se encontraron bacterias en partes de su edificio que no produjeron la fórmula. Abbott retiró voluntariamente esas fórmulas. El retiro del mercado de la fórmula, más la escasez de alimentos relacionada con la pandemia ha resultado en una escasez a nivel nacional. Hay algunos pasos importantes a tener en cuenta para que todos los bebés tengan fuentes suficientes y seguras de fórmula o leche materna necesarias. La lactancia materna siempre será más saludable para la nutrición y el sistema inmunitario del bebé, pero algunas mamás no pueden amamantar o es posible que no produzcan suficiente leche materna. Obtenga el consejo de su médico y nutricionista/dietista. Si recibe beneficios del programa W.I.C. (Mujeres, Bebés y Niños), puede hablar con los nutricionistas del programa sobre cómo obtener ayuda con las técnicas de lactancia si está amamantando o recibiendo suministros de fórmula que necesita su bebé.

Qué Hacer

Que No Hacer

Elija una fórmula infantil segura. No haga fórmula casera.
Siga las instrucciones de la fórmula para prepararla de manera adecuada y segura. No le dé fórmula aguada a su bebé.
Siga los consejos de su médico y nutricionista para la fórmula. No le dé a su bebé leche de vaca, leche para niños pequeños o sustitutos de la leche (a menos que se lo indique su médico)
Busque lugares de confianza para comprar u obtener donaciones seguras. No compre fórmula en sitios de internet desconocidos o fuera de los Estados Unidos.
Si necesita leche materna, busque bancos de leche materna seguros. No acepte donaciones de leche materna de fuentes desconocidas.

Recuerde lavarse las manos antes de preparar la fórmula y almacenar adecuadamente la fórmula o la leche materna.  Find Infant Formula   CT WIC updates   CT Formula Temporary Substitution List

Fuentes:https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts/abbott-voluntarily-recalls-powder-formulas-manufactured-one-plant  ; https://www.fns.usda.gov/ofs/infant-formula-safety; https://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/InfantandToddlerNutrition/formula-feeding/choosing-an-infant-formula.html

Escrito y compilado por:

Umekia R. Taylor, MS, RDN, CDN, Heather Peracchio, MS, RDN, CDN, Sherry Gray, MPH, RD, Michael J. Puglisi, Ph.D., R.D. 

Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)

05/2022 

Green Snow Pro: Best Practices for Salt Application

snow removal on the UConn Campus in Storrs
Snow and snow removal begins outside the South Campus Residences on Feb. 1, 2021. (Peter Morenus/UConn photo)

The scientific studies continue to pile up, and confirm the same thing: road salt is causing lots of problems in our streams, lakes and groundwater. The majority of salt applied is sodium chloride, also known as rock salt. In the absence of a new “miracle” deicer, salt will continue to be the most cost-effective product for the foreseeable future. Therefore, the only way to reduce the impacts will be to reduce the amount applied, while still keeping surfaces safe for travel.

Salt washes off the streets and into our soil and waterways. In the soil, it percolates down and changes the soil structure. Too much salt in the soil means plants are unable to grow. We often see dead grass along the roads or sidewalks. High salt content in the soil is often the cause of the dead grass. Salt also enters our water systems and increases salinity levels in our water, even during the summer months. This has detrimental effects on human, animal, and environmental health.

The Green Snow Pro program started at UConn during the fall of 2018. Green Snow Pro is a voluntary salt applicator certification program. Program staff trains municipal public works employees and private contractors. This training includes information about the science of salt, the downstream impacts of salt, how to properly apply salt given weather conditions, and how to calibrate equipment. The program is modeled after the University of New Hampshire’s Green Snow Pro program.

The Connecticut Training and Technical Assistance Center (T2 Center) is the primary leader. They lead the one-day trainings as part of their Road Scholar program. The Center for Land Use Education and Research (CLEAR) collaborates with the T2 Center on other state salt initiatives with UConn educators, regulators, and public works professionals. The class focuses on best practices for salt application and maintenance of public works facilities and equipment. Demonstrations and case studies illustrate the positive impact these strategies can have on communities and operations. 

T2 Center staff trained UConn’s facilities staff, and there were substantial reductions in salt use in the first season alone. Green Snow Pro applicators at UConn used over 2,600 less tons of salt, corrected for the number of storms. This resulted in a savings of over $313,000 in salt costs alone. Green Snow Pro’s success highlights education’s lasting environmental benefits. Already, professionals in more than 58 towns statewide have participated in the voluntary training. 

We developed a guide, CT Green Snow Pro Best Practices for Municipalities that all municipalities and employees can use. Case studies highlighting the programs success in Ellington, South Windsor, and Manchester were also created and are used in training sessions. Other resources are available on the program website. 

“We learned the ways to salt roads versus bridges. It gave us a greater knowledge of salting the road, rather than just going out and thinking it’s good enough,” says Andrew Menard, a course participant from the Town of Manchester Highway Department. “We have mathematical equations now for how many pounds per lane mile to use and that’s really helpful. We now know if the salt we’re applying is doing what we think it’s supposed to be doing.” 

Although we cannot fix our salt problem overnight, programs like this offer the best hope to tackle this very serious problem. Visit s.uconn.edu/GreenSnowPro for more information.

Article by Mike Dietz

Food and Nutrition Classes at Home

boy planting a seedling
Photo: Heather Pease

Hartford County’s Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) provided virtual nutrition education and cooking programs to limited resource adults and youth in 2021.

We held the Cook and Chat virtual series for adults online. It included sessions on cooking basics, food safety, food budgeting, and nutrition topics over three to 12 lessons. Programs partners were agencies in Enfield, Plainville, New Britain, Hartford, and Bristol. They prepared easy, nutritious recipes from home and had a group discussion. Participants received the ingredient and equipment lists before each class. Participants also received incentives for completing the program surveys and dietary recalls. These included measuring cups, grocery bags, food thermometers, and cutting boards. The early evening programs were popular since participants could use the recipe for their meal.

A virtual youth program in the summer focused on gardening, nutrition, cooking, and fitness. Human Resources Agency (HRA) in New Britain partnered with EFNEP. This was a workforce development project for youth entering ninth grade. This intensive program was 20 hours per week and held via Google classroom. Youth learned about health and nutrition careers while completing gardening and fitness activities.

EFNEP Educators positively interacted with participants despite the challenges of completely virtual environments. Youth and adult participants were eager to learn about nutrition, food budgeting, and easy recipes. Adults felt comfortable cooking in their own homes. They were also more likely to replicate a recipe for their family at a later date. The incentives motivated participants. They stayed engaged in the lessons and completed our evaluation surveys and dietary recalls. In many ways, the EFNEP educators learned a great deal more about a family’s needs in this personal space. The pandemic created new challenges. EFNEP’s efforts evolved and continues serving limited resource youth and adults.

Article by Sharon Gray, RD

Extension Donor Support is Growing Statewide Programming

high school student sitting with a notebook by the Fenton River
Photo Kara Bonsack

The work of UConn Extension serves thousands of people across Connecticut. UConn Extension educators work in all 169 cities and towns helping Connecticut residents to solve problems in their communities and provide transformational learning experiences to program participants. This couldn’t be done without the financial support of generous donors, many of whom have experienced Extension programs firsthand. 

Donations for Extension programs are made through the UConn Foundation which is an independent nonprofit organization that operates exclusively to promote the educational, scientific, cultural, research and recreational objectives of the University of Connecticut and UConn Health. Housed within the Foundation are funds specifically earmarked for Extension programming that provide critical support to these programs and make it possible to develop innovative programming for Connecticut residents. Here are some examples of programs made possible by the generous contributions of UConn Extension donors.

David E. and Nancy H. Bull CES Innovative Programming Fund

A generous gift from Nancy H. and David E. Bull provides funding to support innovative programming in Extension through a competitive application process open to personnel with a full or partial Extension appointment. Applications must explicitly identify the innovation proposed and the risks involved along with the potential to influence future program delivery. Some of the projects funded include:

UConn CAHNR GMO Team received funding to address the lack of science-based information for citizens regarding genetically modified organisms (GMOs). A multi-faceted educational approach provided unbiased information which included a web site, a panel discussion on the Storrs campus, development of curriculum for youth audiences, and short videos on GMO subjects.

Assistant Extension Educators Abby Beissinger and Shuresh Ghimire received funding to establish a hot water seed treatment program to combat seed-borne pathogens that cause early infections in fields. Identified in 2019 listening sessions as a top agricultural priority in Connecticut, Dr. Ghimire and Ms. Beissinger shared the hot water treatment protocols and workshop curricula and work collaboratively with other states to contribute to best practices.

UConn Natural Resources Conservation Academy program leaders received funding to address equity and inclusion within community conservation practices. NRCA implemented a series of participatory processes to co-design local conservation projects with multiple community stakeholders in the metro-Hartford area. The goal of this project is to allow communities to meaningfully contribute to the development of conservation that is most in demand within their community.

Master Gardener Fund

UConn Extension’s Master Gardener Program began in 1978 instructing participants in science-based horticulture practices and garden management, after which students apply their knowledge by engaging in community education, including lectures, educational displays, demonstrations, and plant clinics, as well as various outreach projects throughout Connecticut. Donations to the Master Gardener Fund within the UConn Foundation are critical to the ongoing training and community outreach that they provide. Donations contribute to salaries of the Master Gardener coordinators housed in each of the local Extension Centers in Connecticut. Donations literally keep the program going and also allow for increased accessibility and flexibility in learning modalities which combines online learning with traditional classroom instruction. 

4-H Centennial Fund

The 4-H Centennial Fund was created in 2002 in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the national 4-H program. Donations to the fund ensure that participants in the UConn 4-H program have the opportunity to participate in unique and exciting state, regional and national 4-H events. Many 4-H alumni remember their experience at Citizenship Washington Focus or National 4-H Congress. These trips provide important leadership and civic engagement experiences that youth don’t get elsewhere. A delegation of youth once again attended the 2021 National 4-H Congress and plans are underway for the 2022 Citizenship Washington Focus. 

Donations to UConn Extension through the UConn Foundation have made it possible to reach more people with unique and innovative programming that solves problems in communities and enriches the lives of Connecticut families. Donors can rest assured that their contributions matter and significantly impact the lives of Connecticut residents. 

Please consider supporting Extension at s.uconn.edu/GiveToExtension

Article by Nancy Wilhelm

Job: Educational Program Assistant – Part-Time in Fairfield Co.

Search #: 496223Work type: Part-timeLocation: Fairfield County Extension CtrCategories: Academic Programs and Services

JOB SUMMARY

The UConn Extension Center located in Bethel, CT is seeking applications for a part-time Educational Program Assistant 1 position (50%).  This position is responsible for supporting and helping implement high-quality, comprehensive, Extension programming at different program sites throughout the region, with specific support to Urban Agriculture, EFNEP/Community Nutrition, Master Gardener, and 4-H programs. The Educational Program Assistant will report to the Center Coordinator to prioritize programmatic work assignments.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

  1. Assists and provides support to Extension Educators working with programs which may include but not be limited to Urban Agriculture, EFNEP/ community nutrition, Master Gardener, and 4-H programs.
  2. Assists in developing educational programs, recruiting, explaining, and providing program information and processes to Extension volunteers and participants.
  3. Works with and helps develop and refine program databases using programs such as Excel and Access, as well as national and federal databases such as 4-H, Z-Suite, and WebNEERS to extrapolate relevant data sets, maintain program enrollments, membership, and volunteer records and provide program reports to the Extension educators as required.
  4. Maintains accurate records on each program and assembles databases and prepares statistical and/or historical reports for Extension educators/Program Coordinators based on program outcomes.
  5. Performs office support functions, in support of educational programs; processes paperwork, records, and files which may be computerized or confidential in nature.
  6. Supports Extension Educators/Program Coordinators in implementing and providing off-site educational activities in the community to improve practical understanding and accomplish program goals.
  7. Provides assistance in assembling, arranging, organizing, and dismantling program event and activity set-ups and arrangements at various locations and venues, i.e. classrooms, fairgrounds, community centers, etc.
  8. Supports media relations activities for various programs; works with others to write and edit program and promotional materials for hard and soft copy publications and social media platforms.
  9. Assists Extension Educators/Program Coordinators in assessing clients’ capacity to participate in programs and helping to incorporate related knowledge into program activities for greatest learning opportunities.
  10. Assists Extension Educators/Program Coordinators in developing and implementing programs to enhance learning and provide appropriate content-based experiences to accomplish program goals.
  11. Under supervision, provides educational training and conducts related support services on an ongoing basis, and assists in resolving problems in assigned area of responsibility.
  12. Assists with increasing community collaborations with partner groups.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS 

  1. Bachelor’s degree in related field and up to one year of related experience or an Associate’s degree and two to three years of related experience; or four to five years of experience utilizing profession based standards in urban agriculture, community nutrition, gardening, 4-H or related fields.
  2. Demonstrated written and verbal communication skills and ability to work effectively with communication technologies and the media.
  3. Proficiency in Microsoft Office Suite including Excel and Access and other database activities.
  4. Demonstrated sensitivity towards diverse youth, families, and volunteer clientele to be served.
  5. Must be detail-oriented. Demonstrated experience providing organizational support in a team environment including but not limited to filing, database management, and administrative processes.
  6. Must be able to regularly lift, carry, load, unload, and transport equipment, supplies, and/or program materials for educational events and workshops such as laptops, projectors, tables, chairs, displays, paper media, etc.
  7. Must be willing and able to work flexible and irregular hours, including occasional nights and weekends to help conduct programs at off-site locations.
  8. Must have reliable transportation to meet in-state travel requirements (mileage allowance provided).

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS 

  1. Knowledge and familiarity with the Cooperative Extension System.
  2. Demonstrated success in public relations utilizing electronic, social, and print media platforms.
  3. Experience working with large databases, and generating reports including 4-H online registration.
  4. Experience participating with collaborative community partnerships.
  5. Experience working with UConn administrative processes.
  6. Experience with STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) technology.
  7. Multilingual – Spanish and English preferred

Physical Requirements: Incumbents must possess the ability to perform the required duties set forth above.

APPOINTMENT TERMS 

This is a part-time (50%, 17.5 hours) position based in Bethel, CT. The annual salary will be prorated according to the percent of employment.

TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT

Employment at the University of Connecticut is contingent upon the successful candidate’s compliance with the University’s Mandatory Workforce COVID-19 Vaccination Policy.  This Policy states that all workforce members are required to have or obtain a Covid-19 vaccination as a term and condition of employment at UConn, unless an exemption or deferral has been approved.

Employment of the successful candidate is contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment criminal background check.

TO APPLY

Please apply online at https://hr.uconn.edu/jobs, Staff Positions, Search #496223 to upload a resume, cover letter, and contact information for three (3) professional references.

This job posting is scheduled to be removed at 11:55 p.m. Eastern time on May 1, 2022.

All employees are subject to adherence to the State Code of Ethics which may be found at http://www.ct.gov/ethics/site/default.asp.

The University of Connecticut is committed to building and supporting a multicultural and diverse community of students, faculty and staff. The diversity of students, faculty and staff continues to increase, as does the number of honors students, valedictorians and salutatorians who consistently make UConn their top choice. More than 100 research centers and institutes serve the University’s teaching, research, diversity, and outreach missions, leading to UConn’s ranking as one of the nation’s top research universities. UConn’s faculty and staff are the critical link to fostering and expanding our vibrant, multicultural and diverse University community. As an Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity employer, UConn encourages applications from women, veterans, people with disabilities and members of traditionally underrepresented populations.

Advertised: Apr 01 2022 Eastern Daylight TimeApplications close: May 01 2022 Eastern Daylight Time

Waterbury 4-H Youth Mentoring Program is Thriving

Waterbury 4-H youth dance squadWaterbury’s 4-H program is going strong! As we all know the past two years have been far from ordinary. While Waterbury Youth Services, Inc. (WYS) has been facilitating 4-H programing for 30 years, we have had to face new challenges and with them, new joys. While in person programming was not an option, our team of mentors put together bi-monthly activities which we mailed to our 4-H families. Just like if we were in person, our activities were seasonally themed and encouraged members to get outside, collaborate with their families and communities, and hopefully learn a thing or two while having fun. We sent out monthly challenges, in which youth would send back evidence of a completed “challenge” such as a scavenger hunt or science experiment, each submission an entry to a gift card drawing.

This summer, our summer camp had a blast integrating 4-H Healthy Living activities into our camp day. We ate food from every color of the rainbow, reminded each other to drink plenty of water, and even prepared “go-bags” that members were able to take home and discuss emergency plans with their families. They were so excited to receive achievement awards from our UConn Extension collaborators (Ms. Peggy and Ms. Maryellen) at the end of summer.

4-H youth with a mentor working on codingOur dance program is back in full swing with our new dance coach Ms. Tatiana. Their first performance was at Waterbury Youth Services annual Back to School Rally in August, a citywide event where families can get free backpacks, school supplies, and resources for their students. The 4-H dance team’s debut was a huge success, with an original performance followed by the team leading the crowd in line dances like the cha-cha, slide and cupid shuffle. They also put together an original dance for our Halloween family night as well as our Winter Holiday family night.

Creative arts has been working on seasonal decorations for our WYS hallway now that peopleWaterbury 4-H youth coding project are back in the building. From paper crafts to painting to sculpture, there is no limit to this group’s creativity. This spring they will be taking on photography, and we cannot wait to see what the capture.

Our new Coding group is thriving. We are balancing computer activities with “unplugged” computer science, such as coding your own name, designing and troubleshooting a maze, and finding the computer science skill of error detection to be quite helpful in magic tricks.

Waterbury Youth Services is proud of our 4-H groups and look forward to many more years of collaboration!

Article and Photos: Amanda Augeri, 4-H Mentoring Coordinator

 

EFNEP/4-H Special Interest group with Danbury Public Schools

UConn Extension in Fairfield County is leading a EFNEP/4-H special interest group with Danbury Public Schools at Rogers Park Middle School.  EFNEP educator Heather Peracchio is engaging students with Teen Cuisine curriculum and hands-on activities in grades 6-8th. During National Nutrition Month in March students enjoyed learning about MyPlate healthy eating and made a Colorful Coleslaw from the Teen Cuisine workbook.

Avian Influenza in Connecticut

chickens in a coop

Poultry and Avian Enthusiasts: Connecticut has confirmed cases of Avian Influenza. Please take proper precautions to protect your birds and minimize disease spread: https://cvmdl.uconn.edu/ai/.
The Connecticut Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (CVMDL) at UConn CAHNR is working with the Connecticut Department of Agriculture and Usda Aphis on diagnosis and surveillance.
TODAY (MARCH 3rd) —FREE WEBINAR: “Healthy Flocks, Healthy Families” on March 3, 2:30pm ET. Hear from USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, the CDC, and other poultry experts on how to keep your small flocks and family safe from salmonella. Register now: bit.ly/APHISWebinar_March2022

Avian Influenza Frequently Asked Questions

This information is courtesy of the Connecticut Department of Agriculture.

What Is Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI)? 

Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) is an extremely infectious viral disease that occurs naturally in wild birds and can spread to domestic birds. 

The virus has led to the disposal of about 48 million poultry in 21 Western and Midwestern states since December of 2014. 

No confirmed cases have occurred since June. The virus has not been detected in the Northeast or Connecticut, but there is concern that it may spread to the Northeast during the fall or spring wild bird migration. 

Is there a public health risk? 

The federal Centers for Disease Control (CDC) consider the risk to people to be low, and no human infections have been detected. 

The risk to the food supply and consumers is also low, and controls are in place to preclude poultry and eggs from affected flocks from entering the food system. Poultry and eggs that are properly handled and cooked are safe to eat. 

What kind of birds can the virus affect? 

The virus can infect chickens, turkeys, pheasants, quail, ducks, geese and guinea fowl, as well as a wide variety of wild birds. 

How many poultry are there in Connecticut? 

There are an estimated 5 million poultry housed on approximately 240 farms in Connecticut. The state is also home to numerous people who own a small number of poultry for exhibition, meat and egg production. 

What is the state doing to reduce the risk of the virus spreading here? 

The state Department of Agriculture and other state and federal agencies have created a task force that is preparing for a potential incident of HPAI in Connecticut, and is ready to implement a response plan if necessary. 

The task force includes the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) – which is responsible for monitoring the wild bird population – the Department of Public Health, the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection, and the Connecticut Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory. 

The emergency response plan follows these five basic steps: 

Quarantine – restricting movement of poultry and poultry-moving equipment into and out of the control area. 

Eradicate – depopulate the affected flock(s). 

Monitor region – testing wild and domestic birds in a broad area around the quarantine area. 

Disinfect – kills the virus in the affected flock locations. 

Test – confirm that the poultry farm is free of HPAI. 

The task force is also in active, ongoing communication with neighboring states and the U.S Dept. Of Agriculture (USDA) to prepare for the detection of HPAI in Connecticut. 

The USDA has experience with the previous three HPAI outbreaks in commercial poultry in the U.S., in 1924, 1983 and 2004. No human illnesses were associated with those incidents, or the current one. 

The agriculture department has been conducting outreach about HPAI for several years. 

The agency is now working with poultry owners to prepare for a potential incident, and is urging them to register their birds with the state. 

How is the virus spread? 

It is typically spread to poultry from direct contact with wild birds or a contaminated environment. Once established in a domestic poultry flock, it can spread rapidly. 

It is also spread by the movement of infected poultry, contaminated poultry equipment, and people who can transfer the virus between farms on their shoes and clothing. 

What should poultry owners do to reduce the risk of its spread? 

Eliminate opportunities for domestic birds to interact with wild birds. Owners of birds should avoid visiting other farms, homes or facilities that also have birds. 

Those who must visit another premises with poultry should practice strict bio-security measures, such as wearing clean clothes and shoes, and keeping vehicles clean and free of dirt, manure and other organic material. 

In addition, knowing the signs to look for and monitoring the health of birds on a regular basis is very important. 

Signs to look for include: 

 Unusual, high mortality of birds 

 Nasal discharge 

 Respiratory distress 

 Swelling around the head, eyes and neck 

 Decreased consumption of food and water 

 A drop in egg production 

Poultry owners are being urged to register their birds or flocks with the state, and can do so by going to the homepage of the Dept. of Agriculture’s website: CTGrown.gov. 

Poultry owners may also call the Dept. of Agriculture at 860-713-2504. 

Who can I contact to register my flock or if I suspect my poultry are infected? 

Poultry owners may call the state Department of Agriculture at 860-713-2504, or the USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593. 

Who can I contact if I find a dead wild bird that I suspect may be carrying the virus? 

Any concerns about wild birds should be forwarded to the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection’s Wildlife Division at 860-424-3011, or by clicking on www.cfwwildbirdmortalityreporting.ct.gov/