COVID-19

USDA Announces Pandemic Assistance for Timber Harvesters and Livestock Producers

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Announcement for Livestock Producers

USDA to Provide Pandemic Assistance to Livestock Producers for Animal Losses

Farm Service Agency Will Begin Taking Applications for indemnity program July 20th

Livestock and poultry producers who suffered losses during the pandemic due to insufficient access to processing can apply for assistance for those losses and the cost of depopulation and disposal of the animals. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Vilsack announced the Pandemic Livestock Indemnity Program (PLIP) in [recorded] remarks at the National Pork Industry Conference in Wisconsin Dells, WI.  The announcement is part of USDA’s Pandemic Assistance for Producers initiative. Livestock and poultry producers can apply for assistance through USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) July 20 through Sept. 17, 2021.

 The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, authorized payments to producers for losses of livestock or poultry depopulated from March 1, 2020 through December 26, 2020, due to insufficient processing access as a result of the pandemic. PLIP payments will be based on 80% of the fair market value of the livestock and poultry and for the cost of depopulation and disposal of the animal. Eligible livestock and poultry include swine, chickens and turkeys, but pork producers are expected to be the primary recipients of the assistance.

“Throughout the pandemic, we learned very quickly the importance and vulnerability of the supply chain to our food supply,” said Agriculture Secretary Vilsack. “Many livestock producers had to make the unfortunate decision to depopulate their livestock inventory when there simply was no other option. This targeted assistance will help livestock and poultry producers that were among the hardest hit by the pandemic alleviate some financial burden from these losses.”

 Additional Assistance Planned

 The previous administration proposed pandemic assistance using flat rates across the industry, which does not take into account the different levels of harm felt by different producers.   Pork industry supported analysis projected that disruptions in processing capacity in the pork supply chain create a situation with small hog producers and especially those that sell on the spot market or negotiate prices, bear a disproportionate share of losses.  USDA has examined the difference between the negotiated prices for hogs and the 5-year average and documented a significant drop during April through September of 2020 due to the pandemic.  USDA has set aside up to $50 million in pandemic assistance funds to provide additional assistance for small hog producers that use the spot market or negotiate prices.  Details on the additional targeted assistance are expected to be available this summer.

 PLIP Program Details

 Eligible livestock must have been depopulated from March 1, 2020 through December 26, 2020, due to insufficient processing access as a result of the pandemic. Livestock must have been physically located in the U.S. or a territory of the U.S. at the time of depopulation.

Eligible livestock owners include persons or legal entities who, as of the day the eligible livestock was depopulated, had legal ownership of the livestock. Packers, live poultry dealers and contract growers are not eligible for PLIP.

PLIP payments compensate participants for 80% of both the loss of the eligible livestock or poultry and for the cost of depopulation and disposal based on a single payment rate per head.  PLIP payments will be calculated by multiplying the number of head of eligible livestock or poultry by the payment rate per head, and then subtracting the amount of any payments the eligible livestock or poultry owner has received for disposal of the livestock or poultry under the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) or a state program. The payments will also be reduced by any Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP 1 and 2) payments paid on the same inventory of swine that were depopulated.

 There is no per person or legal entity payment limitation on PLIP payments. To be eligible for payments, a person or legal entity must have an average adjusted gross income (AGI) of less than $900,000 for tax years 2016, 2017 and 2018.

 Applying for Assistance

 Eligible livestock and poultry producers can apply for PLIP starting July 20, 2021, by completing the FSA-620, Pandemic Livestock Indemnity Program application, and submitting it to any FSA county office. Additional documentation may be required. Visit farmers.gov/plip for a copy of the Notice of Funding Availability and more information on how to apply.

 Applications can be submitted to the FSA office at any USDA Service Center nationwide by mail, fax, hand delivery or via electronic means. To find your local FSA office, visit farmers.gov/service-locator. Livestock and poultry producers can also call 877-508-8364 to speak directly with a USDA employee ready to offer assistance.

As USDA looks to long-term solutions to build back a better food system, the Department is committed to delivering financial assistance to farmers, ranchers, and agricultural producers and businesses who have been impacted by COVID-19 market disruptions.  Since USDA rolled out the Pandemic Assistance initiative in March, the Department has announced over $7 billion in assistance to producers and agriculture entities.  For more details, please visit www.farmers.gov/pandemic-assistance.

 USDA touches the lives of all Americans each day in so many positive ways. In the Biden-Harris Administration, USDA is transforming America’s food system with a greater focus on more resilient local and regional food production, fairer markets for all producers, ensuring access to healthy and nutritious food in all communities, building new markets and streams of income for farmers and producers using climate smart food and forestry practices, making historic investments in infrastructure and clean energy capabilities in rural America, and committing to equity across the Department by removing systemic barriers and building a workforce more representative of America. To learn more, visit www.usda.gov.

Announcement for Timber Harvesters and Haulers

USDA Announces Pandemic Assistance for Timber Harvesters and Haulers

Farm Service Agency Will Begin Accepting Applications on July 22

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is providing up to $200 million to provide relief to timber harvesting and timber hauling businesses that have experienced losses due to COVID-19 as part of USDA’s Pandemic Assistance for Producers initiative. Loggers and truckers can apply for assistance through USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) July 22 through Oct. 15, 2021. The Pandemic Assistance for Timber Harvesters and Haulers program (PATHH) is administered by FSA in partnership with the U.S. Forest Service.

The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, authorized this critical assistance for the timber industry. Timber harvesting and hauling businesses that have experienced a gross revenue loss of at least 10% during the period of Jan. 1 and Dec. 1, 2020, compared to the period of Jan. 1 and Dec. 1, 2019, are encouraged to apply.

“USDA’s Pandemic Assistance for Producers initiative promised to get financial assistance to a broader set of producers and today’s announcement delivers on that promise,” said Secretary Vilsack. “On top of the existing challenges associated with natural disasters and trade, the pandemic caused a major disruption for loggers and timber haulers including lack of access to wood processing mills. This industry plays a critical role in our nation’s economy and we are proud to support these hard-working loggers and truckers as they get back on track.”

“Like many facets of the agriculture industry, the logging industry has experienced its share of financial hardships throughout the pandemic,” said FSA Administrator Zach Ducheneaux. “We’re happy to work with the U.S. Forest Service to develop this new program to provide critically needed support.”

“We’ve heard from loggers and truckers whose livelihoods were significantly impacted this past year by the COVID-19 pandemic, and we are pleased that USDA can help alleviate some of the financial burden,” said Forest Service Chief Vicki Christiansen. “I encourage those logging and log-hauling businesses hardest hit by the pandemic to learn more about the assistance offered through this new program.”   

Program Details

To be eligible for payments, individuals or legal entities must be a timber harvesting or timber hauling business where 50% or more of its gross revenue is derived from one or more of the following:

·         Cutting timber.

·         Transporting timber.

·         Processing of wood on-site on the forest land (chipping, grinding, converting to biochar, cutting to smaller lengths, etc.).

 

Payments will be based on the applicant’s gross revenue received from Jan. 1, 2019, through Dec. 1, 2019, minus gross revenue received from Jan. 1, 2020, through Dec. 1, 2020, multiplied by 80%. FSA will issue an initial payment equal to the lesser of the calculated payment amount or $2,000 as applications are approved. A second payment will be made after the signup period has ended based upon remaining PATHH funds.

The maximum amount that a person or legal entity may receive directly is $125,000.

Applying for Assistance

Loggers and truckers can apply for PATHH beginning on July 22 by completing form FSA-1118, Pandemic Assistance for Timber Harvesters and Haulers Program application, and certifying to their gross revenue for 2019 and 2020 on the application. Additional documentation may be required. Visit farmers.gov/pathh for more information on how to apply.

Applications can be submitted to the FSA office at any USDA Service Center nationwide by mail, fax, hand delivery, or via electronic means. To find a local FSA office, loggers and truckers can visit farmers.gov/service-locator. They can also call 877-508-8364 to speak directly with a USDA employee ready to offer assistance.

FSA will host a stakeholder webinar on Wednesday, July 21 at 3 p.m. Eastern. Interested participants must register for the webinar.

As USDA looks to long-term solutions to build back a better food system, the Department is committed to delivering financial assistance to farmers, ranchers, and agricultural producers and businesses who have been impacted by COVID-19 market disruptions. Since USDA rolled out the Pandemic Assistance for Producers initiative in March, the Department has announced over $7 billion in assistance to producers and agriculture entities.  For more details, please visit www.farmers.gov/pandemic-assistance.

USDA touches the lives of all Americans each day in so many positive ways. In the Biden-Harris Administration, USDA is transforming America’s food system with a greater focus on more resilient local and regional food production, fairer markets for all producers, ensuring access to healthy and nutritious food in all communities, building new markets and streams of income for farmers and producers using climate smart food and forestry practices, making historic investments in infrastructure and clean energy capabilities in rural America, and committing to equity across the Department by removing systemic barriers and building a workforce more representative of America. To learn more, visit www.usda.gov.

 

UConn Extension is Strengthening Immunization Excitement Through USDA-NIFA, CDC Grant Funding

blue square with text vaccine resourcesUConn Extension received funding to strengthen immunization excitement in Connecticut through a grant funded project by USDA-NIFA, the Extension Foundation, and the CDC. The UConn project focuses on residents in Windham, Middletown, East Hartford, Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation, and Groton.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provided $9.95 million in funding to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) to support an innovative approach to community education and partnerships to advance adult immunization. This is the two agencies’ first concentrated vaccine education effort.

NIFA will use this funding, provided in an interagency agreement, to support Land-grant Universities and the Cooperative Extension System in delivering immunization education to the communities they serve to improve vaccine confidence. Extension will also work with local partners, including healthcare providers, to make COVID-19 and other adult vaccines more accessible for rural, medically under-served and other harder-to-reach communities.

Our secondary cities continue to be underserved in statewide public health initiatives, and COVID immunization levels in Connecticut align with this trend. While our state is relatively successful in our initial immunization efforts, pockets of underserved audiences exist at the first level of vaccination.

From informal qualitative data from a stakeholder in our target audience, the UConn Extension team is well positioned to identify key community influencers and work to address barriers to vaccinations in communities.

Our goal is to strengthen excitement for immunization in our five secondary cities in Connecticut. We are working with stakeholders to understand the barriers, identify key community influencers, create target social media and print media to increase vaccine awareness, efficacy, and safety and willingness to obtain vaccination. 

“Cooperative Extension educators are recognized and trusted messengers in their communities and can help deliver fact-based information on the COVID-19 vaccine and other adult vaccines,” said Dr. Jay Butler, CDC’s Deputy Director for Infectious Diseases. “We know vaccination rates overall are lagging in rural communities, and Extension agents can play an important role in building COVID-19 vaccine confidence and increasing vaccine access within the communities they serve.”

“Cooperative Extension has a century of experience as change agents and educators in communities across America,” said NIFA director Dr. Carrie Castille. “NIFA is proud to be the federal partner with such a trusted educational resource, but especially in this effort to deliver science-based vaccine education. This new partnership with CDC is a natural fit for the Extension System to do what they do best – provide balanced, reliable information so people can make informed decisions.”

“Vaccinations are a critical step in fully re-opening our nation. This partnership between USDA and CDC is an important part of our National Strategy to combat the COVID-19 pandemic and getting Americans fully vaccinated,” said Dr. Sara Bleich, USDA senior advisor for COVID. “The President has directed us to make it easier for those living in rural communities to access vaccines by sending vaccines to rural health clinics, increasing vaccine education and outreach efforts in rural communities with resources from the American Rescue Plan (ARP), and increasing funding for rural health clinics and hospitals to respond to the pandemic with testing and mitigation measures.”

NIFA invests in and advances agricultural research, education, and Extension across the nation to make transformative discoveries that solve societal challenges. NIFA supports initiatives that ensure the long-term viability of agriculture and applies an integrated approach to ensure that groundbreaking discoveries in agriculture-related sciences and technologies reach the people who can put them into practice. In FY2020, NIFA’s total investment was $1.95 billion.

UConn Extension has more than 100 years’ experience strengthening communities in Connecticut and beyond. Extension programs address the full range of issues set forth in the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources strategic initiatives:

  • Ensuring a vibrant and sustainable agricultural industry and food supply
  • Enhancing health and well-being locally, nationally, and globally
  • Designing sustainable landscapes across urban-rural interfaces
  • Advancing adaptation and resilience in a changing climate.

Programs delivered by Extension reach individuals, communities, and businesses in each of Connecticut’s 169 municipalities. 

Connecticut Residents Urged to Pick Up the Phone! for Largest-Ever Town-Level Survey on Quality of Life and Recovery from COVID-19

Connecticut Residents Urged to “Pick Up the Phone!” for Largest-Ever Town-Level Survey on Quality of Life and Recovery from COVID-19: Over 75 Leading Foundations, Hospitals, and Local Agencies Join DataHaven Initiative

Over 10,000 randomly-selected Connecticut residents will participate in the 2021 Community Wellbeing Survey’s live, in-depth interviews, the fifth such survey that DataHaven has fielded since 2012

hand holding a phone with textHow has the COVID-19 pandemic impacted your health and financial well-being? Are the parks in your neighborhood in good condition? What has been your experience with telehealth appointments over the past year? What is your life like today and what do you think it will be like in five years? 

Those are just a few of the topics included in interviews by friendly survey-takers helping DataHaven and dozens of leading community and charitable groups complete what is believed to be the largest neighborhood-level well-being survey in the United States. Since 2012, some 50,000 randomly-selected adults living in every ZIP code in Connecticut have volunteered their time to participate in the program’s live, in-depth interviews, including the over 10,000 interviews projected to take place by the end of 2021.  

“Our experience is that people enjoy answering the questions in this survey,” says Mark Abraham, Executive Director of DataHaven, a 25-year-old non-profit organization that leads the collection and study of public data about Connecticut. “They are sharing their knowledge about how their families and communities have been faring during the past year, and about their own life experiences. These questions show that we care about how they feel, and create important indicators that will inform how Connecticut recovers from COVID-19.”

The 2021 DataHaven Community Wellbeing Survey will allow unprecedented tracking of statewide, regional, and local trends over the past year. After seeing the impact of the 2012, 2015, 2018, and 2020 results, over 75 of Connecticut’s leading hospitals, government agencies, and charitable organizations have decided, once again, to support the 2021 survey. Funders include community foundations, United Ways, healthcare providers, community-based non-profits, local health departments, and other agencies located in Hartford, New Haven, Bridgeport, Stamford, Waterbury, Norwalk, Danbury, Greenwich, Milford, Middletown, Windsor, New London, Torrington, Derby, Windham, and many other cities and towns (see below). To ensure that the topics in the survey reflect the interests of local communities, including those that arose during the pandemic, an Advisory Council of representatives from 300 organizations around the state helped guide this year’s survey design.

Residents throughout Connecticut are receiving phone calls from survey-takers at the Siena College Research Institute beginning this month. Calls continue this summer and fall. 

“Make a difference: Pick up your cell phone, help your community learn more about your needs, and tell us what you want to see to promote greater happiness and well-being in your neighborhood,” says Abraham.

“UNITED BY DATA”: FUNDERS AND SUPPORTERS FOR THE 2021 COMMUNITY WELLBEING SURVEY 

Unlike most statewide and national surveys, the DataHaven program brings together grassroots efforts across the state – effectively unifying dozens of existing regional surveys into a single, exceptionally high-quality program that covers the entire state. The mission of the initiative is to produce reliable neighborhood-level information on issues that are most meaningful to local residents, and to foster collaboration between the hundreds of organizations, institutions, businesses, and agencies that are working to build stronger communities.  This nationally recognized program provides neighborhood- and regional-level information not available from any other source on community vitality, health, housing, family economic security, safety, and other topics.

“We believe the 2021 Community Wellbeing Survey, the most comprehensive local-level survey of its type in the United States, will continue to be of great value to neighborhoods and organizations striving to make our cities and towns even better places to live and work,” says Abraham.

Results from the survey will be published in a series of local and statewide reports throughout 2021 and 2022, helping to shed light on progress being made toward community priorities, including financial security for families, access to affordable health care, public health and safety, and opportunities for children to succeed, as well as on current challenges, such as the opioid epidemic, housing instability, and recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. Dozens of reports and studies have used data from the Community Wellbeing Survey, including many that are posted on the DataHaven website.

Partners providing the support required for the program are representative of each region:

  • In Fairfield County and the Greater Danbury area, organizations including Fairfield County’s Community Foundation, the Health Improvement Alliance of Greater Bridgeport, Bridgeport Hospital, Saint Vincent’s Medical Center, Stamford Hospital, Greenwich Hospital, Danbury Hospital, Norwalk Hospital, Supportive Housing Works, United Way of Coastal Fairfield County, United Way of Western Connecticut, Norwalk Health Department, Stamford Health Department, and the Danbury Health Department are among the funders.
  • In the Greater New Haven and Naugatuck Valley areas, funders include The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven, Greater Waterbury Health Partnership, Connecticut Community Foundation, Valley Community Foundation, Yale New Haven Hospital, Griffin Hospital, Waterbury Hospital, Saint Mary’s Hospital, City of New Haven, United Way of Greater New Haven, United Way of Greater Waterbury, Milford Health Department, Community Alliance for Research and Engagement, NewAlliance Foundation, Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments, Yale School of Medicine, and others. 
  • In Greater Hartford and New Britain, the program has drawn support from the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving, Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Hartford Hospital, The Hospital of Central Connecticut, United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut, Johnson Memorial Medical Center, City of Hartford, Town of Windsor, Trinity College Center for Urban and Global Studies, Capitol Region Council of Governments, Eastern Connecticut Health Network, and others.
  • Additionally, DataHaven will ensure that residents of Connecticut’s smaller cities and rural areas are included to the same degree as those living in its major metropolitan areas. Support comes from organizations including Connecticut Office of Rural Health, Connecticut Health Foundation, Northwest Connecticut Community Foundation, Windham Hospital, Backus Hospital, Charlotte Hungerford Hospital, Lawrence + Memorial Hospital, MidState Medical Center, Sharon Hospital, Bristol Hospital, North Central District Health Department, Universal Health Care Foundation of Connecticut, Middlesex Hospital, Eastern Highlands Health District, Planned Parenthood of Southern New England, Connecticut Council on Problem Gambling, Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services’ (DMHAS) Problem Gambling Services division, and Northeast District Department of Health.

 

ABOUT DATAHAVEN

DataHaven is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization with a 25-year history of public service to Connecticut. Since 1992, DataHaven has worked with area organizations and agencies to develop reports and tools that make information more useful to the community. DataHaven maintains extensive economic, social, and health data, including information collected through its Community Wellbeing Survey and other programs. DataHaven is a formal partner of the National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership, a collaborative national effort by the Urban Institute and approximately 40 local partners to further the development and use of neighborhood information systems in local policymaking and community building. For more information, visit www.ctdatahaven.org.

Contacts: Mark Abraham, info@ctdatahaven.org, 203.500.7059, www.ctdatahaven.org 

Original Post

Pick-Your-Own Revisited

strawberries

Last year we held a virtual discussion on how to deal with Pick-your-own in the age of COVID. This year we will revisit this topic with several growers sharing what they did that worked, maybe didn’t work as well as expected or at all, will keep this year, or will drop because it may not be needed. With vaccines and an ever changing landscape it may be a moving target. It is safe to say we all liked the masks because it resulted in less eating in the field. Keeping the requirement?  Let’s chat and get prepared as an industry for the upcoming season. Join UConn Extension and growers including Jamie Jones, Jones Family Farms, Shelton CT; Russell Holmberg, Holmberg Orchards, Gales Ferry CT; Michaele Williams, Bishops Orchards, Guilford CT; Don Preli, Belltown Hill Orchards, South Glastonbury CT; Andre Tougas, Tougas Family Farm,  Northborough MA; and Trevor Hardy, Brookdale Orchards, Hollis NH.

Pick-Your-Own Revisited

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Beginning at 7 pm

Free, registration NOT required. Join us using the following link:

http://bit.ly/PickYourOwn-COVID

Amid pandemic challenges, recreational shellfishing thrived

By Judy Benson

Judy Benson / Connecticut Sea Grant

While the pandemic curtailed many favorite activities, recreational shellfishing remained popular and even surged in many shoreline towns last year.

“Clamming is a very COVID-friendly activity,” said Peter Harris, chairman of the Waterford-East Lyme Shellfish Commission. “You’re outside, you have a nice long rake so you stay socially distanced, and you get a nice food source.”

More than 500 shellfishing permits sold in 2020 for the WELSCO beds in the Niantic River – about the same number as in 2019, but COVID concerns did have an impact. One of the most popular areas had to be closed because too many boats were congregating there, creating a “party atmosphere” that wasn’t safe, he said. Finding a way to safely sell permits also proved challenging.

Similar stories of strong interest in shellfishing in 2020 along with unique challenges presented by the pandemic were heard from representatives of the 12 commissions that attended the Annual Meeting of Shellfish Commissions on Feb. 13. Usually conducted in-person, this year’s virtual meeting brought together about 35 of the volunteers who serve on municipal commissions along with scientists, regulators and extension specialists from the state Department of Agriculture Bureau of Aquaculture and Connecticut Sea Grant.

The experts presented updates on monitoring programs for the various pathogens that can cause illnesses and force shellfish bed closures, a review of water sampling protocols and in-person inspections of areas being considered for new bed openings.

“We can now assess mooring areas differently, and we may be able to create opportunities in some new areas,” said Alissa Dragan, environmental analyst at the Bureau of Aquaculture. “Our goal is to have one or two new areas opened in the next year.”

Before inviting each of the commissions to report on the past year, Tessa Getchis, aquaculture extension specialist at Connecticut Sea Grant, shared some of the projects underway or being considered to advance awareness and collaboration about recreational shellfishing. Those include the possible creation of an association of shellfish commissions and a shared online platform where members of different commissions could share information. An analysis of the impact of economic impact of recreational shellfishing is in the works, she added.

“We want to show how important the sector is and how important your work is,” she said.

Read more

COVID-19 Vaccine

covid bannerIt’s hard to imagine a time when we didn’t know COVID-19 existed. Now when people say “virus,” we know what they mean. The impact of COVID-19 on our lives, our activities, and our freedom has affected us all. The responsibility is ours, as a community, to help stop this virus. Now we have a new, safe, and effective tool to help us do that—COVID-19 vaccines.

Getting vaccinated adds an important layer of protection for you, your family, and loved ones. Here are some things you should know about the COVID-19 vaccine:

 

  • All COVID-19 vaccines currently available in the United States are very effective at preventing the disease.
  • The most common side effects are pain in the arm where you got the shot, feeling tired, headache, body aches, chills, and fever.
  • Stopping a pandemic requires using all the tools we have available—wearing masks, staying at least 6 feet apart from people who don’t live with you, avoiding crowds and poorly ventilated spaces, washing your hands frequently, and getting vaccinated.

If you have questions about the COVID-19 vaccine, visit CDC’s FAQs web page: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/faq.html.

 To learn more about the different vaccines for COVID-19 and how vaccines work, visit:

 https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/different-vaccines.html

Farm Flavor Magazine Features Extension Programs

group of people in masks at a farm
Commissioner Hurlburt doing farm visits to meet with producers to discuss the challenges they faced.

In the early days of the coronavirus pandemic, farmers urgently needed access to the newest information on government compliance, health protocols, federal aid and more. UConn Extension put together its own website for COVID-19-related information for both farmers and consumers on production, distribution and processing. UConn Extension also responded by organizing an initiative that enlisted UConn 4-H members and volunteers to distribute more than 144,000 pounds of surplus milk and other products from Connecticut dairies to 53 food pantries in the state.

Read the full article and the article on the work our Connecticut Sea Grant program is doing.

Hurricanes and COVID – 19

Preparing for the 2020 hurricane season or severe storms during the COVID – 19 pandemic requires more planning than usual. 

First, make a “go kit” – a bag you can grab and go should you need to evacuate!  Pack a kit for each household member and pet with a 2-week supply of emergency food, water, medicine and a thermometer for storing refrigerated medicines, flashlights, chargers, cell phones, close contacts list, important documents (unless you store these in the cloud) and personal items.  Since the pandemic, you should pack hand sanitizer and/or hand wipes, gloves, disinfectant/disinfectant wipes, soap, and at least 2 masks per person for people older than two years. 

If you are exempt from wearing a mask for medical or behavioral reasons, discuss how to manage community requests with your health care provider.  If you require specialized care, discuss potential shelter, hospitalization or other options with your health care provider well in advance of approaching storms. 

Check with your town hall to learn about shelter admission policies since COVID – 19, occupancy limits, and perhaps new locations for both people and pets.  Bring copies of veterinary records such as a rabies certificate and vaccines, certificates of adoption or ownership, photos of you and your pet, and consider getting a microchip for your pet. 

https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/hurricanes/covid-19/prepare-for-hurricane.html

COVID-19 Resources: Hand washing & Activity Risk Chart

hand washing
Photo: Clemson Extension

Are You Keeping Your Hands Clean?

Keeping your hands clean is a good way to keep germs away. Make sure you are washing your hands effectively and are scrubbing every part! California.gov has published a graphic that details parts of our hands we often miss when handwashing. To view click here.

Estas Manteniendo Tus Manos Limpias?

Manteniendo sus manos limpias es una buena forma de mantener alejados los gérmenes. Asegúrese de lavarse las manos de manera eficaz, tallando todas las partes. California.gov a publicado un gráfico que enseña partes que muchas veces no so talladas. Para verlo haga clic aqui.

covid 19 risk chartCOVID-19 Risk Chart

What activities put you more at risk of getting COVID-19?

The Texas Medical Association has created a chart ranking activities from low to high risk.

Click here to view the chart.