livestock

Virtual Learning Circles – New England Women in Livestock Business

cows in pasture

Tuesday, 10/06/2020 to Thursday, 10/15/2020

Virtual Learning Circles

Join us for a two-day focus session where women livestock producers from around New England will tune in virtually to learn how to strengthen communication and improve negotiation skills to become an even more effective employer and business manager. During this program, women producers will have the unique opportunity to work closely in small groups with like-minded farmers from around the region. We are lucky to have UVM Extension Specialist, Mary Peabody, to lead us through this program.

Participants will also have the chance to partake in a facilitated discussion to help shape the curriculum for the upcoming New England Women in Livestock Business virtual conference which will address risks associated with managing a farm business such as, financial planning, market viability, and farm safety. There are three opportunities to participate in these focus sessions with limited space in each session, so pre-registration is required!

Pick from one of the following dates below when you register:

  • Track One, Morning Session—October 6 & 13, 10am-12pm
  • Track Two, Afternoon Session—October 7 & 14, 12:30-2:30pm
  • Track Three, Evening Session—October 8th & 15, 6:30pm-8:30pm

To register click here.

For questions or for special accommodations contact Elaina Enzien at elaina.enzien@unh.edu or 603-679-5616.

 

This material is based upon work supported by USDA/NIFA under Award Number 2018-70027-28588. This program is in partnership with UNH Cooperative Extension, UVM Extension, UMaine Cooperative Extension, New Entry Sustainable Farming Project, and The Tri-State SARE Project.

Original Post

Joe Emenheiser Joins UConn Extension as Diversified Livestock Educator

Joe EmenheiserUConn Extension is pleased to welcome Dr. Joe Emenheiser as our new statewide Livestock Extension Educator. Joe was raised in PA on a small family farm and got his start in the livestock industry with market lambs in 4-H. He built his own flock by shearing sheep and went on to attend Oklahoma State University and graduate with a degree in animal science. He was on the Reserve National Champion Meats and Livestock Judging teams at OSU, and then went to Virginia Tech where he received his MS in quantitative genetics and PhD in beef production systems.
Joe’s interest in meat quality improvement and carcass evaluation led him to work in both the livestock industry and in academia. He comes to us from the University of Vermont where he taught in the Department of Animal and Veterinary Sciences and was formerly the state Extension Livestock Specialist. He has also taught at the Vermont Technical College. Joe has developed his own flock of Suffolk and he serves on the Breed Improvement Committee of the United Suffolk Sheep Association. He will be working with diversified livestock producers statewide focusing on livestock and meat production systems and economic development.
Joe will be based in Brooklyn at the Windham Extension office. He will also be teaching one course a semester in the Department of Animal Science, including Livestock Management and Livestock and Carcass Evaluation.

Job Opening: Assistant/Associate Extension Educator – Livestock

Angus beef cattle crazing on horsebarn hill at UConn
Cows and calves graze along Horsebarn Hill.
Job Opening: We are seeking an Assistant/Associate Extension Educator, Extension Diversified Livestock. This position is based in Brooklyn, Connecticut, and is a joint appointment with the UConn Department of Animal Science in UConn CAHNR. Minimum qualifications include an earned masters’ degree in animal science. Full details and information on applying are posted at: https://bit.ly/ExtensionLivestock

Livestock BCS Video Series

We have a new video series on Body Condition Scoring (BCS) for livestock. Our Tri-State SARE project produced videos for beef cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. You can view the entire series at: http://s.uconn.edu/bcs

The Tri-State SARE project, Nutrition’s Role in Sustainable Livestock Production, focuses on animal nutrition as it relates to health and well-being of animals, pasture management and nutrient management decisions/plans. This project is designed to increase engagement of Cooperative Extension Personnel in Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, Departments of Agriculture, other state and local agencies, USDA agencies and NGOs, and farmers in the production, processing and marketing of natural locally grown meats and other products for consumers.

This project is designed to increase engagement of Cooperative Extension Personnel in Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, Departments of Agriculture, other state and local agencies, USDA agencies and NGOs, and farmers in the production, processing and marketing of natural locally grown meats and other products for consumers.

Biosecurity Workshop Provides Healthy Discussion

By Joyce Meader

dairy barn
Mary Margaret Cole at the Kellogg Dairy Barn on Jan. 16, 2014. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)

How would a dairy or livestock business survive if a Foreign Animal Disease arrived in the United States? Using Foot and Mouth Disease as an example, participants of this week’s Biosecurity Work­ shop heard from Dr. Richard Horowitz about the New England Secure Milk Supply’s steps to maintain a permit to ship milk when the disease has not reached your farm. These included: secure the perimeter, clean and disinfect sources of the virus, and daily monitor for the disease.

Dr. Cantor, New England Emergency Coordinator for USDA APHIS, related the threat that other countries have experienced and how a two-week delay in notification increased the severity of the control measures drastically. It is not, IF, but WHEN the disease is transported into our country again. The last occurrence was in 1929 in San Francisco, but world travel by farm visitors and importation of animals is so much more common now.

Dr. Andrew, UConn Dairy Specialist, presented the map of the UConn dairy and livestock barns, and the many visitors and vehicles travel between barns and from the community. The group provided their recommendations for the Line of Separation to establish the safe zone on the farm, and the outside to keep out sources of infection.

And finally, Dr. Lis, CT Department of Agriculture, requested that all dairy farms submit a self-assessment to her of their farm readiness to remain disease free in the case of an outbreak. Knowing the commitment of each farm to disease prevention will help in the decision to allow milk pick up during the outbreak. The farmers and staff from the University, State Departments of Agriculture, and USDA APHIS left the workshop ready to continue this discussion at local farm meetings, more aware of the challenges that will be faced by our important food producers and government decision makers when a foreign animal disease arrived uninvited.

For more information, contact Joyce.Meader@uconn.edu.