seafood

Celebrate Seafood Month this October with these recipes

Jacques Pepin's fish tacos, made with local black sea bass fillets.
Jacques Pepin’s fish tacos, made with local black sea bass fillets. Local fluke or flounder fillets can also be used. Judy Benson / Connecticut Sea Grant

Jacques Pepin’s fish tacos, made with local black sea bass fillets, are an easy and delicious way to celebrate National Sea Food Month this October.
Pepin, world-famous chef and resident of Madison, provided this recipe as part of two collections of 21 recipes from eight Connecticut chefs compiled by Connecticut Sea Grant.
Connecticut Sea Grant is offering these collections, first published in the Spring-Summer 2018 issue of Wrack Lines magazine, as part of the #ShowUsYourSeafood and #EatSeafoodAmerica campaigns this month.

 

 

 

 

PDFs of Recipes of the Sea collections can be downloaded from these two links:

https://seagrant.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1985/2018/05/RECIPES.ofthe_.SEA_.pdf

https://seagrant.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1985/2018/05/wracklines-Spring-2018-5_7-RECIPES.pdf

Seafood Consumption is Increasing

cover of Connecticut seafood survey publicationHuman demand for seafood is rising, but the world ocean can only provide a limited share of what we consume. Over the last 50 years, the average annual growth in seafood production exceeded that of all other types of terrestrial animal production. In 2018, global seafood production was estimated at an all-time high of 178.8 million metric tons, with farmed seafood representing nearly half of the total of all seafood produced.

With capture fisheries production nearly stagnant, aquaculture has been rapidly expanding to meet the needs of a growing population. A new report includes findings from a survey of Connecticut residents about their seafood related consumption, knowledge, behaviors and preferences.

The purpose of the study was to collect data to inform the development of public engagement programs on Connecticut wild and farmed seafood industries and seafood products. Further, the study generated new data useful to seafood producers on consumer willingness to pay for locally farmed products. The report is available at seagrant.uconn.edu.

Article by Tessa Getchis

Connecticut Seafood Survey Can Help Guide Industry

cover of Connecticut seafood survey publication

The final report from the Connecticut Seafood Survey: Assessing Seafood Consumption, Knowledge, Behaviors and Preferences of Connecticut Seafood is now published.

This new report from Connecticut Sea Grant includes findings from a survey of Connecticut residents about their seafood related consumption, knowledge, behaviors and preferences.

Read the report at: https://seagrant.uconn.edu/?p=6305

Survey could help efforts to get more seafood eaten in CT

people eating seafood outside at picnic tables
Photo: Judy Benson

If you’re an average Connecticut resident, you probably didn’t eat seafood more than once in the last week.

But you might, if you knew more about how to prepare different types of fish, shellfish and seaweed, and where to buy local seafood. You’d also be inclined to have seafood more often if you knew more about its safety.

Those are some of the key findings of the Connecticut Seafood Survey, a 2½-year project to better understand current eating habits and how best to make of all types of seafood – but especially the shellfish, seaweed and fish from local waters – a more frequent part of state residents’ diets. Half the residents surveyed said they eat seafood just once a week – which is out of sync with the Food & Drug Administration’s recommendations. The FDA says adults should eat two or more servings per week to get all the nutritional benefits their bodies need.

Read more….

Article and photo by Judy Benson

In pilaf, salmon, manicotti, kelp’s versatility impresses chefs

a chef tastes kelp
Juliet Wong, convention services manager at the Sheraton, samples one of the kelp dishes.

Story and photos by Judy Benson

After tasting rice pilaf with carrots, peppers and kelp, grilled shrimp wrapped in kelp leaves, baked salmon topped with leeks and kelp and manicotti stuffed with mushrooms and kelp, restaurant owner Chris Szewczyk is eager to incorporate the Connecticut-grown seaweed into his menu.

“It’s an exciting product,” said Szewczyk, owner of Taino Smokehouse in Middletown.

Standing nearby in the kitchen of the Sheraton Hartford South in Rocky Hill was Lydell Carter, sous-chef at the hotel restaurant. Between forkfuls of the various dishes, Carter said he, too, is a convert to the possibilities of cooking with kelp.

“I definitely see it’s very versatile,” he said. “I really liked it with the shrimp.  I like the flavor profile and the texture.”

Read more…

Originally posted on the Connecticut Sea Grant website.